On this day: Jean Joseph Merlin was born in 1735

Belgian inventor and horologist Jean Joseph Merlin was born on the 17th of September, 1735.

An inventor of a wide range of things, one of his most unusual patents was for the world’s first pair of roller skates in 1760. Though they were little more than ice skates with wheels where the blades would usually go, it may well be one of his biggest contributions to society.

He also had an interest in automata, and his work took him to Paris and London.

Dying in 1803, here he is as painted by Thomas Gainsborough in 1782.

Belgian inventor and horologist Jean Joseph Merlin was born on the 17th of September, 1735.

Bombing of Wall Street, 1920.

The Wall Street bombing occurred at 12:01 pm on Thursday the 16th of September, 1920 in the Financial District of New York City.

At noon, a horse-drawn wagon passed by lunchtime crowds on Wall Street in New York City and stopped across the street from the headquarters of the J.P. Morgan bank at 23 Wall Street, on the Financial District’s busiest corner. Inside, 100 pounds (45 kg) of dynamite with 500 pounds (230 kg) of heavy, cast-iron sash weights exploded in a timer-set detonation sending the slugs tearing through the air.

Thirty-eight people were killed and one hundred and forty-three injured.

Though nobody was ever convicted of the crime, public sentiment at the time quickly led to people placing the blame on the Soviets or other Communists.

However, investigators and modern historians believe the attack was most likely carried out by Galleanists (Italian anarchists).

Damage from the bombing is still visible on 23 Wall Street.

The aftermath of the bombing.

The Wall Street bombing occurred at 1201 pm on Thursday, September 16, 1920, in the Financial District of New York City. The blast killed 38 and seriously injured 143.

The writing on the side of the picture reads: Dead in front of Morgan’s 1/16/20

800px-Wall-street-vic-200916

 

On this day: Australia in 1870

On the fifteenth of September, 1870, people lined up to be photographed at the planting of the first telegraph pole near Palmerston in Australia.

The Australian Overland Telegraph was 3200 kilometres long and connected Darwin with Port Augusta in South Australia. It was completed in 1872, and meant that for the first time Australia could connect quickly with the rest of the world.

People in the photograph include: Mr Palmer, Mr Burton, Dr Furnell, Dr James Millner, D.D. Daly, Miss Douglas, Mr & Mrs W.T. Dallwood, Willie Douglas, A.T. Childs, Captain & Mrs Douglas.

On the fifteenth of September, 1870, people lined up to be photographed at the planting of the first telegraph pole near Palmerston in Australia.

On this day: the Great Fire of Smyrna began

Smyrna citizens trying to reach the Allied ships during the Smyrna massacres, 1922

Smyrna citizens trying to reach the Allied ships

The Great Fire of Smyrna destroyed much of Smyrna (known as İzmir today) in September 1922. It began on the 13th and was more or less extinguished by the 22nd of September. It effectively marked the end of the Greco-Turkish War.

Smyrna fire, A wide view of the city on fire. 14.Sep.1922. 0600 AM.

The city on fire. 14th September. 0600 AM.

At the outbreak of the fire, up to 400 000 Greek and Armenian refugees were forced to remain on the waterfront while Turkish troops committed massacres.

The death toll from the fire is disputed, but Greek and Armenian deaths are placed somewhere between 50 000 and 100 000.

Izmir,_after_the_fire_in_192215thSeptember

The aftermath.

 

Paris c.1838

Boulevard du Temple, Paris, c. 1838. By Louis-Jacques-Mandé Daguerre.

“Boulevard du Temple”, taken by Daguerre in 1838 in Paris, includes the earliest known candid photograph of a person. The image shows a street, but because of the over ten-minute exposure time the moving traffic does not appear. At the lower left, however, a man apparently having his boots polished, and the bootblack polishing them, were motionless enough for their images to be captured.

Boulevard du Temple, Paris, c. 1838. Louis-Jacques-Mandé Daguerre

On this day: The US President was shot in 1901

This is the last photograph of President William McKinley. In the picture he was ascending the steps of the Temple of Music in Buffalo, New York on the 6th of September, 1901.

He would be shot at close range, and then die of gangrene from an infected bullet wound eight days later.

The last photograph of the late President McKinley. Taken as he was ascending the steps of the Temple of Music, September 6, 1901.