On this day: the shooting of a President

800px-Garfield_assassination_engraving_This engraving of the assassination appeared in Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper on the 16th of July the same year. The President is being supported by Secretary of State James G. Blaine.

This engraving of the assassination appeared in Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper on the 16th of July, 1881. The President is being supported by Secretary of State James G. Blaine.

James Abram Garfield (November 19, 1831 – September 19, 1881) was the 20th President of the United States, serving from March 4, 1881, until his assassination later that year.

James A. Garfield

James A. Garfield, the 20th President of the United States, was fatally shot in the back as well as the arm at the Baltimore and Potomac Railroad Station in Washington D.C. on the 2nd of July, 1881.

Amongst the people who were present when the shooting occurred was Robert Todd Lincoln, son of Abraham.

Baltimore and Potomac Railroad Terminal, 6th Street & Constitution Avenue, Washington, D.C. Opened in 1873, demolished in 1908.

Baltimore and Potomac Railroad Station, which was demolished in 1908. X

He did not die until eleven weeks later. It is now believed that doctors searching for the bullet with unwashed fingers created an infection that caused Garfield’s death. Modern medical specialists believe he would have otherwise recovered from the wounds.

Charles Julius Guiteau (September 8, 1841 – June 30, 1882) was an American writer and lawyer who was convicted of the assassination of James A. Garfield, the 20th President of the United States.

Charles J. Guiteau

The shooter was Charles J. Guiteau, who spent much of his trial behaving bizarrely, and who was executed on the 30th of June the following year.

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One thought on “On this day: the shooting of a President

  1. […] being shot in the back and arm at a railway station on the 2nd of July, US President James A. Garfield died of […]

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