On this day: the release of A Wild Hare

MV5BZjFlNmFlMGItODA5ZS00YTQzLWFlYjMtZDZiMjIyZmViODg2XkEyXkFqcGdeQXVyNzg5OTk2OA@@__V1_A Wild Hare (re-released as The Wild Hare) is a 1940 Warner Bros. Merrie Melodies animated short film.

A Wild Hare, the animated short film that introduced Bugs Bunny, premiered on the 27th of July, 1940.

The film also set the distinct character traits for another Looney Tunes character, Elmer Fudd.

A_Wild_Hare_Lobby_CardA Wild Hare (re-released as The Wild Hare) is a 1940 Warner Bros. Merrie Melodies animated short film.

Bugs Bunny is unnamed in the film, but would be named in his next film the following year.

A Wild Hare went on to receive an Oscar nomination.

On this day: the premiere of Pride and Prejudice

PrideundprejudicePoster for the 1940 film Pride and Prejudice.

The 1940 film version of Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice premiered in the United States on the 26th of July. Greer Garson and Laurence Olivier played Elizabeth Bennet and Mr Darcy, though originally Norma Shearer and Clark Gable were to star.

The 1940 film version of Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice premiered in the United States on the 26th of July. Greer Garson and Laurence Olivier played Elizabeth Bennet and Mr Darcy, though originally Norma Shearer and Clark

Polish poster.

The film was intended to be filmed in England, but the outbreak of World War Two meant production was moved.

Also posted HERE

 

On this day: the aeroplane that landed with no fuel, no engines and no power.

gimli glider - wayne

On the 23rd of July, 1983 Air Canada flight 143 landed on a racing track in Gimli, Manitoba after experiencing both a fuel shortage and the failure of both engines.

All sixty-nine people on board survived.

8.Front escape ramp of the Boeing 767 - 23 July 1983.

After the landing.

The ground crew responsible for the refuelling had calculated the fuel in pounds instead of kilograms, which meant the plane was flying on less than half what it needed to reach its destination.

When one engine failed, the pilots assumed the other would not. However it did, and seconds later the entire plane lost all power, with everything in the cockpit going blank.

One of the pilots had previously served at RCAF Station Gimli, and suggested they try and land there. However, what neither he nor the air traffic controller knew was that part of the base had been converted into a motor racing circuit, including a karting track and an area for drag racing.

Additionally, a Winnipeg Sports Car Club race was underway.

6.Inspecting the damaged aircraft after landing at Gimli - 23 July 1983.

After the landing.

With no working engines, the plane made next to no noise as it approached the track, and so the people on the ground had no warning.

Even so, the pilots managed to land the plane without anyone on the ground being hurt, though one pilot reported two boys were riding their bikes only feet from where the plane came to a stop.

Flight 143 after landing at Gimli, Manitoba.

The only injuries experienced by passengers happened when they were escaping the plane. Because the rear of the plane was higher than normal, the escape slides were not long enough to reach the ground.

 

On this day: the world’s first motor racing contest

#65 Albert Lemaître in Peugeot 3hp at 1894 Paris-Rouen race (2nd place) but judged the official winner. Adolphe Clément is the front seat passenger.

The world’s first motorsport contest took place on the 22nd of July, 1894 from Paris to Rouen, France.

First, a selection event was held in which sixty-nine cars participated. The main 127 kilometre race had twenty-five contestants.

Marquis Jules Félix Philippe Albert de Dion de Wandonne (9 March 1856 – 19 August 1946) was a pioneer of the automobile industry in France.

Count Jules-Albert de Dion circa 1903

Count Jules-Albert de Dion was the first to complete the race, but as cars were also judged on other elements – such as safety – he was not declared the winner. He completed the race in 6 hours and 48 minutes, which averaged 19 kilometres an hour.

On this day: the Hyde Park and Regent’s Park bombings

Cars removed from the scene of the Hyde Park car bomb in which four soldiers died in 1982

On the 20th of July, 1982 the Provisional Irish Republican Army detonated two bombs during military parades in the centre of London. Eleven people were killed and around fifty others injured.

The Hyde Park and Regent's Park bombings occurred on 20 July 1982

In addition to the deaths of soldiers and bandsmen, seven horses were killed.

Police forensic officers working on the remains of the IRA car which housed the Hyde Park car bomb in which four soldiers died in 1982

While Gilbert “Danny” McNamee was convicted of the Hyde Park bombing (a conviction that was later quashed), nobody was ever charged with the bomb at Regent’s Park.