On this day: the birth of a photography pioneer

Louis_Daguerre_2 Portrait of Louis Daguerre (1787-1851) Father of Photography in 1844

Daguerre in 1844

Photography pioneer Louis Daguerre was born in Cormeilles-en-Parisis, Val-d’Oise, France on the 18th of November, 1797. He became known as a father of photography after inventing the daguerreotype photography process.

Daguerreotype_Daguerre_Atelier_1837Still life with plaster casts, made by Daguerre in 1837, the earliest reliably dated daguerreotype photograph.

Daguerre’s 1837 photograph recreating a still life is the earliest daguerreotype with a reliable date.

Boulevard du Temple, Paris, c. 1838. Louis-Jacques-Mandé Daguerre

Above is Daguerre’s circa 1838 image of Paris. It is the first known candid photograph of a person. A man having his boots polished stood still long enough to be captured.

Also a painter and the inventor of the diorama theatre, Daguerre died in Paris in July of 1851, at the age of sixty-three.

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On this day: Nocton Hall is Gutted by Fire

Nocton_Hall_1901 Nocton Hall as it appeared in Country Life on the 28th of September, 1901. Lincolnshire, England. Gutted by fire in 2004.

The Hall in Country Life. 28th September 1901.

On the 24th of October, 2004, Nocton Hall – a Grade II listed building in Lincolnshire, England – was gutted by fire for a second time. The Hall is the former home of Frederick John Robinson, 1st Earl of Ripon, who served as British Prime Minister in the 1820s.

An investigation concluded the destruction was caused by arson, but so far nobody has been arrested.

In addition to being home to a number of prominent residents, the Hall was also used as a location to treat wounded soldiers in both the First and Second World Wars.

The current building is a nineteenth-century construction that was built to replace the original sixteenth-century house, which was also destroyed by fire.

Today, the ruined house stands empty while its future is debated.

Fashion Plates: 150 Years of Style

Fashion Plates 150 Years of Style by April Calahan (Editor), Karen Trivette Cannell (Editor), Anna Sui (Foreword).

Fashion Plates: 150 Years of Style by April Calahan (Editor), Karen Trivette Cannell (Editor), Anna Sui (Foreword).

I saw this book in Barcelona just over a month ago, and decided there was no way I was lugging something this big and heavy all the way home! I was glad to find it on The Book Depository, both in paperback and hardcover. Of course, if you buy from there you get the book with free shipping (I shudder to think how much it would be to Australia otherwise!).

Fashion Plates 150 Years of Style by April Calahan (Editor), Karen Trivette Cannell (Editor), Anna Sui (Foreword)..

This is one of those books that will appeal to history nerds, historical fiction and romance readers, etc.

On this day: a Communist takeover in China

The Chinese city of Guangzhou fell to the Communists on the 14th of October, 1949. In the image below, the so-called People’s Liberation Army can be seen entering the streets.

PLA_Troops_entered_to_Guangzhou Communist People's Liberation Army troops entered to Guangzhou on October 14, 1949. China 14th October 1949.

Prior to the takeover, for a few months the city served as the capital of the Republic of China as other parts of the country fell to communism.

Street_view_of_Canton_(Guangzhou) Canton (Guangzhou), China in the 1860s.

Guangzhou (Canton) in the 1860s.

After the Communist occupation, much of the city’s heritage and cultural icons were destroyed.

On this day: American Civil War Propaganda

This poster was printed in Lexington, Kentucky on the 9th of October, 1862. Issued by Confederate supporter and politician Lt. James B. Clay, son of prominent politician Henry Clay, the poster urges the people of the state to resist the Union forces.

Source

Printed broadside issued by Henry Clay's son, Lt. James B. Clay, in which he makes a plea for Southern sympathizers to defend their homes from Yankee invasion. Lexington, Kentucky. 9 Oct

 

On this day: the founding of Nelson’s Column

1844williamhenryfoxtalbotOn the 30th of September, 1840, the first stone of Nelson_s Column, the 52-metre structure in the centre of London_s Trafalgar Square was laid.

Photograph taken by William Henry Fox Talbot in 1843.

On the 30th of September, 1840, the first stone of Nelson’s Column, the 52-metre structure in the centre of London’s Trafalgar Square, was laid.

The column was commissioned to commemorate Admiral Horatio Nelson, who died at the Battle of Trafalgar in 1805.

The first stone was laid by Charles Davison Scott, and the completed structure was opened three years later, in 1843.