On this day: a Rescue from the Rubble

Thredbo Landslide. 2nd August 1997. This photograph was taken moments after Stuart Diver was freed from the rubble after spending 65 hours buried in the rubble. Mr Diver lost his first w

After spending sixty-five hours trapped in freezing conditions in the rubble of the Thredbo landslide, Stuart Diver was pulled alive from his collapsed ski lodge on the evening of the 2nd of August, 1997.

Eighteen people, including Diver’s wife, were killed when the land at the New South Wales, Australia ski resort collapsed, sending over 1000 tonnes of earth and debris down on top of the village.

Despite his discovery providing hope more survivors might be found, Diver was the last person found alive in the rubble.

Diver’s second wife also died, of cancer in 2015.

On this day: the Thredbo Landslide

1997 Thredbo Landslide

At 11:35pm on the 30th of July, 1997, a landslide hit the ski village of Thredbo in New South Wales, Australia.

Eighteen people were killed as two ski lodges were destroyed by over 1000 tonnes of earth and debris.

Famously, ski instructor Stuart Diver survived in the freezing conditions of a collapsed building until his rescue on the evening of the 2nd of August. His wife Sally was beside him in the wreckage but drowned when she became trapped in a depression that filled with water.

On this day: the opening of the Queen Victoria Building

Designed as a marketplace, the Queen Victoria Building in Sydney, Australia opened on the 21st of July, 1898.

queen%20victoria%20buildingon-21-july-1898-sydney-celebrated-as-mayor-alderman-mathew-harris-officially-opened-the-queen-victoria-markets-building-victorian-british-empire

X

The building was designed in Victorian Romanesque style by Scottish-born architect George McRae, and constructed between 1893 and 1898.

invitation_to_qvb_opening_1898-blank-formal-invitation-card-to-the-ball-for-the-opening-of-the-queen-victoria-market-building-on-21-july-1898

Invitation to the opening. X

More than a thousand guests attended a ball on the night of the building’s opening, where Sydney’s Lord Mayor, Matthew Harris, gave a speech.

The Sydney icon survived twentieth-century discussions of remodelling and even demolition, and today is a popular tourist attraction and shopping destination.

On this day: Awarding the Victoria Cross

The Prince of Wales (the future King Edward VIII) presents military awards during his visit to Adelaide, South Australia on the 12th of July, 1920. Corporal Arthur Sullivan.

The Prince of Wales (the future King Edward VIII) presents military awards during his visit to Adelaide, South Australia on the 12th of July, 1920.

The man receiving the Victoria Cross, the highest military honour in both Britain and Australia, has been identified as Corporal Arthur Sullivan. Brigadier General John Macquarie Antill, Commandant of SA stands behind the Prince.

Prince Edward became King in 1936, and abdicated the same year.

R.I.P. Bryan Lawrence

Bryan Lawrence in Le Conservatoire. The Australian Ballet, 1965. Photo Ken Byron, Australian News and Information Bureau.

Bryan Lawrence, a soloist with Britain’s Royal Ballet before moving to Australia to become one of The Australian Ballet’s early principals, died over the weekend. He was in his eighty-first year.

Swan Lake Royal Ballet School performance 1960 with Shirley Grahame. — with Shirley Grahame Kershaw. Bryan Lawrence.

With Shirley Grahame.

After retiring, Lawrence and his ballerina wife Janet Karin moved to Canberra where they founded a highly successful ballet school. Their graduates went to on star with companies such as American Ballet Theatre, the Joffrey Ballet, and – of course – The Australian Ballet. Ross Stretton, the late director of both Australia’s national company and The Royal Ballet, also began his training there.

On this day: a Royal Visit to Colonial Australia

Prince Albert Victor and Prince George visit a mine in Ballarat, Victoria, Australia. 1881.

The young Princes in Ballarat during the same 1881 visit to Victoria. X

On the 5th of July, 1881 the Princes Albert Victor and George (the future King George V of the United Kingdom) visited Bendigo in the colony of Victoria, Australia to open a fountain in honour of their mother.

Albert_Victor_late_1880s Albert Victor photographed by Bassano, c. 1888.

Prince Albert Victor in the late 1880s.

The Alexandra Fountain, named for Alexandra of Denmark, daughter-in-law of Queen Victoria, is the second largest municipal fountain in what is now the state of Victoria.

Prince George, the future King George V, 1893.

George in 1893.

Albert died of influenza less than a decade after this Australian visit, leaving younger brother George to go on to become King in 1910.

The Alexandra Fountain is arguably the most prominent monument in Bendigo. Designed by W.C.Vahland. 1881.

The fountain in 2013.