What Happened on Twenty-third Street, New York City.

The short film What Happened on Twenty-third Street, New York City was released in August, 1901.

Depicting a couple walking down the street in New York, the woman’s skirts are lifting by air when she walks over a grate.

While it only runs for 77 seconds, the film is credited with providing inspiration for similar scenes in movies in the decades afterwards.

On this day: a parade in London

The partially built County Hall is in the background.

Victory march of the Allied troops in London. July 19th, 1919.

Victory march of the Allied troops in London. July 19th, 1919. The procession crossing Westminster Bridge. Saturday 19th July 1919 and contingents of Military units are taking part in th

On this day: Peace Day in Britain

Soon after the end of the First World War, the 19th of July was designated as Peace Day in Britain.

The image below was taken on that day in 1919, during celebrations outside the Guildhall in Winchester in Hampshire.

Peace_day_in_Winchester Photograph of a crowd of people celebrating the end of the First World War. 19th July 1919 was designated Peace Day and was marked in different ways across the co

On this day: Awarding the Victoria Cross

The Prince of Wales (the future King Edward VIII) presents military awards during his visit to Adelaide, South Australia on the 12th of July, 1920. Corporal Arthur Sullivan.

The Prince of Wales (the future King Edward VIII) presents military awards during his visit to Adelaide, South Australia on the 12th of July, 1920.

The man receiving the Victoria Cross, the highest military honour in both Britain and Australia, has been identified as Corporal Arthur Sullivan. Brigadier General John Macquarie Antill, Commandant of SA stands behind the Prince.

Prince Edward became King in 1936, and abdicated the same year.

The Canary Girls

The so-called “Canary girls” were British women who worked through the First World War to make trinitrotoluene (TNT) shells. The nickname was given to them as repeated exposure to the substances they used turned their skin the colour of a canary.

Hundreds of the women became ill from the conditions they worked in, with one hundred fatalities reported.

The image below is of women in Nottinghamshire in July, 1917.

Female munitions workers guide 6 inch howitzer shells being lowered to the floor at the Chilwell ammunition factory in Nottinghamshire, UK. July 1917.