On this day: a Communist takeover in China

The Chinese city of Guangzhou fell to the Communists on the 14th of October, 1949. In the image below, the so-called People’s Liberation Army can be seen entering the streets.

PLA_Troops_entered_to_Guangzhou Communist People's Liberation Army troops entered to Guangzhou on October 14, 1949. China 14th October 1949.

Prior to the takeover, for a few months the city served as the capital of the Republic of China as other parts of the country fell to communism.

Street_view_of_Canton_(Guangzhou) Canton (Guangzhou), China in the 1860s.

Guangzhou (Canton) in the 1860s.

After the Communist occupation, much of the city’s heritage and cultural icons were destroyed.

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On this day: American Civil War Propaganda

This poster was printed in Lexington, Kentucky on the 9th of October, 1862. Issued by Confederate supporter and politician Lt. James B. Clay, son of prominent politician Henry Clay, the poster urges the people of the state to resist the Union forces.

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Printed broadside issued by Henry Clay's son, Lt. James B. Clay, in which he makes a plea for Southern sympathizers to defend their homes from Yankee invasion. Lexington, Kentucky. 9 Oct

 

On this day: Italian sailors arrive in Libya

Landing_of_Italian_sailors_on_5th_October_1911The first detachment of sailors landing underneath the Konak in Tripoli on 5th October 1911. Libya. Africa.

Source

This photograph shows Italian sailors arriving in Tripoli, the capital of the North African land of Libya, on the 5th of October, 1911.

Italy and Turkey fought a war in the region from late September, 1911 until October, 1912. The conflict resulted in an Italian victory, and the Kingdom of Italy captured what was to become known as Italian Libya.

Italy lost control of Libya in 1943, when losing ground to the Allies in the Second World War.

On this day: an Ammunition Plant Explosion

GillespieExplosion Man standing in a large crater from T. A. Gillespie Company Shell Loading Plant explosion in Sayreville, New Jersey. October 1918. World War One.

A man stands in the crater left by the explosion. October 1918.

Disaster struck New Jersey, USA on the 4th of October, 1918, when an explosion hit the T. A. Gillespie Company Shell Loading Plant. The First World War munitions plant, one of the largest in the world, was hit by a large explosion that started a fire and went on to trigger more explosions over the next two days.

The plant itself, as well as some three-hundred other buildings, were destroyed.

Because employment records were destroyed in the explosion the exact death toll is unclear, however it is believed to be around a hundred. Hundreds of other people were injured.

Residents of Morgan NJ in flight along the road to Perth Amboy and safety from the series of great explosions which destroyed the Shell-loading Plant of T. A. Gillespie & Company. Octobe

Residents being evacuated.

The disaster is generally believed to be an accident.

About a century later, the area is still affected by explosive substances.

On this day: Australian troops in Damascus, Syria.

The caption for this photograph (as written by the Australian War Memorial, Canberra) is as below:

The Turkish Hospital in Damascus on 1 October 1918, shortly after the entry of the Australian 4th Light Horse Regiment.

To read more about this complicated point in Syrian and Middle Eastern history, you can begin HERE.

4ALHinDamascus The Turkish Hospital in Damascus on 1 October 1918, shortly after the entry of the Australian 4th Light Horse Regiment.

On this day: the Battle of the Canal du Nord

The Battle of the Canal du Nord was fought in France between Allied forces and the German Empire from the 27th of September to the 1st of October, 1918, resulting in an Allied victory.

This photograph, dated as the first day of the battle, shows a horse team of the British Royal Field Artillery pulling a field gun up a slope near Moeuvres.

Battle of the Canal du Nord. British Army. A Horse team of the Royal Field Artillery pulling an 18 pounder field gun up the slope of a cutting through the bank of the Canal du Nord, near