On this day: a new Parliament House

Construction of New Parliament House, Canberra, 26 April 1988. Australia. Federal Government.

In this photograph dated the 26th of April, 1988, the massive flagpole is constructed on top of Australia’s new Parliament House in the capital city, Canberra.

The new building was constructed at the time of Australia’s bicentenary, replacing what would become known as Old Parliament House, the white building at the front of the picture.

New Parliament House was officially opened by Queen Elizabeth II on the 9th of May.

 Opening_parliament_house_1988Crowds attend the official opening of the new Parliament House Building in 1988. Canberra.

The official opening in 1988.

On this day: the demolition of the Old Melbourne Gaol

Australia’s Old Melbourne Gaol photographed while being taken apart on the 19th of April, 1937.

The gaol is most famous for being the place of the execution of bushranger (highwayman) Ned Kelly in 1880.

melbourne_gaol_demolitiondemolition-of-the-old-melbourne-gaol-19-april-19-1937

On this day: the Doolittle Raid

The Doolittle Raid, a series of US bomb attacks on Japan, took place on the 18th of April, 1942. Also called the Tokyo Raid, it was seen as retaliation for the Pearl Harbor attack a few months before.

Army_B-25_(Doolittle_Raid)The Doolittle Raid, also known as the Tokyo Raid, on Saturday, April 18, 1942,

On this day: the 1983 US embassy attack

The April 18, 1983, United States embassy bombing was a suicide bombing in Beirut, Lebanon, that killed 63 people, including 17 Americans. 3 days afterwards.

On the 18th of April, 1983 a car bomb was detonated by a suicide attacker outside the United States embassy in Beirut, Lebanon. Sixty-three people were killed and over a hundred injured.

The bombing came after America and other Western countries intervened in the Lebanese Civil War. The victims included over thirty Lebanese employees, seventeen Americans, and various passersby.

The attack was claimed by the Islamic Jihad Organisation, a pro-Iranian group.

President Ronald Reagan and First Lady Nancy Reagan pay their respects and tribute to the 13 American civilian and 4 U.S. military personnel victims of the embassy bombing. Beirut. Leban

Ronald and Nancy Reagan view the caskets of the Americans killed. X

Following the bombing, the US embassy was moved to an allegedly safer location.

However, the new embassy was bombed by Islamic militant group Hezbollah the following year, killing another twenty-four people.

The Lebanese Civil War continued until 1990.