On this day: the Battle of the Somme

Wounded British soldiers come in from the advanced dressing station at Bernafay Wood on the 19th of July 1916. The photograph was taken by Ernest Brooks, the British military’s first-ever official war photographer.

The Battle of the Somme ran from July to November of 1916 and claimed well over a million lives, making it one of the worst battles in the history of war.

The_Battle_of_the_Somme,_July-november_1916_Q811Wounded soldiers coming in from the advanced dressing station at Bernafay Wood, 19th July 1916.

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On this day: British Troops in France

Sherman tanks of the Staffordshire Yeomanry, 27th Armoured Brigade, carrying infantry from 3rd Division, move up at the start of Operation 'Goodwood', Normandy, 18 July 1944. British Arm

British soldiers head off to fight in Operation Goodwood in Normandy, France, on the 18th of July, 1944. Second World War.

The offensive took place between the 18th and 20th, and resulted in 3474 British casualties and the loss of 314 British tanks.

From the collection of the Imperial War Museum.

On this day: Renovations in Cambridge

Kings_College_Chapel_1987_-_geograph_org_uk_-_882971Kings College Chapel 1987 Kings College Chapel Cambridge with scaffolding renovations 18th July 1987. England Vintage Retro

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King’s College Chapel, Cambridge in England is seen here covered in scaffolding on the 18th of July, 1987.

The chapel, built during the Wars of the Roses, is home to the world’s biggest fan vault, and famous for its stained glass windows.

On this day: Nuclear tests during the Cold War

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7th August 1957: The tail of an airship sticks up in the air after it was brought down by a nuclear test in Nevada, USA.

The downing of the (unmanned) ship came at the height of tensions during the Cold War, at a time Russian/Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev, infamous for carrying out Stalinist purges in Ukraine, was repeatedly threatening the West with nuclear annihilation.

928 nuclear tests were held at the site in Nevada. The frequent mushroom clouds, seen for miles, became Las Vegas tourist attractions.

The Chilwell Disaster Anniversary

Women_at_work_during_the_First_World_War-__Q30023Women at work during the First World War- Munitions Production, Chilwell, Nottinghamshire, England, UK, c 1917 1918 explosion disaster W

The factory in 1917.

Today is the 101st anniversary of the Chilwell munitions factory explosion, when 134 people were killed and another 250 injured in England during the First World War.

Chilwell became known for its “Canary girls“, women who worked in dangerous conditions constructing TNT shells for the British military. Photographs of the women were used to promote the British war effort.

Women_at_work_during_the_First_World_War-__Q30023Women at work during the First World War- Munitions Production, Chilwell, Nottinghamshire, England, UK, c 1917 1918 explosion disaster W

1917

Eight tons of TNT blew up in the disaster, and the explosion was heard twenty miles away. Because so few victims were identified a mass grave now stands nearby.

The site of the factory became a military installation, which will close in 2021.

On this day: the Opening of the Royal Military College, Duntroon.

The Royal Military College, Australia's army officer training establishment, was officially opened in Duntroon, Canberra on the 27th of June, 1911.

The opening ceremony in 1911.

The Royal Military College, Australia’s army officer training establishment, was officially opened in Duntroon, Canberra on the 27th of June, 1911.

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Governor-General, Lord Dudley presided over the ceremony. The college was built on the land surrounding the Campbell family homestead.

The college was so new at the outbreak of the First World War that the first officers had not completed their training when Australia joined the conflict in early August, 1914.