On this day…

eyam_church_derbyshire_1890 england victorian britain

The church in Eyam, circa 1890.

Tomorrow the village of Eyam in Derbyshire, England recognises “Plague Sunday”.

The day remembers the decision of the village’s reverend and his wife – in 1665 – to convince the plague-stricken residents to barricade themselves in so that the disease wouldn’t spread to other villages in the area.

Hundreds of people died, but other communities survived.

Below is a picture from last year, when we visited the old well on a hilltop outside the village, which is where others would come to leave the people of Eyam food.

cof

Dunluce Castle

I visited Dunluce Castle yesterday afternoon (and it was free because of a European heritage weekend!). That’s me in the last picture, rushing back to the car when it started pouring rain!

I’ve been to the castle before, but forgot how enormous it is, on the edge of a windy cliff. A few centuries ago some of the castle actually fell into the sea.

IMG_20180909_231638_224

IMG_20180909_232218_349

IMG_20180909_232546_078

Ukrainian Christmas

The Adoration of the Shepherds, (Поклоніння пастухів). A Ukrainian religious painting taken from an iconostasis, and dated between 1650 and 1700.

The 6th of January is Christmas Eve for Ukrainians of all Christian denominations.

The main Christmas celebrations take place at this time.

shepherds_bow_-_google_art_projectthe-adoration-of-the-shepherds-by-the-google-art-project-%d1%83%d0%ba%d1%80%d0%b0%d1%97%d0%bd%d1%81%d1%8c%d0%ba%d0%b0-%d0%bf%d0%be%d0%ba%d0%bb%d0%be%d0%bd%d1%96

 

The banning of Christmas

The celebration of Christmas was banned by Puritans in Boston, Colonial America in 1659. The ban was revoked by an English governor in 1681, however Christmas celebrations did not gain popularity in the area until the middle of the nineteenth century.

Through these years the holiday continued to be observed in other parts of America. It fell out of favour after the American Revolution, but returned to favour some years afterwards.

X

puritanchristmasbanpublic-notice-from-1659-in-boston-regarding-the-banning-the-celebrations-of-christmas

Guy Fawkes

guy_fawkes_confessionthis-is-a-confession-by-guy-fawkes-a-member-of-the-failed-gunpowder-plot-to-blow-up-the-houses-of-parliament-in-london-on-the-5th-of-november-1605

X

This is a confession by Guy Fawkes, a member of the failed Gunpowder Plot, to blow up the Houses of Parliament in London, on the 5th of November, 1605.

Fawkes was tortured for some time before his confession, and the damage done to him can be seen in his shaky signatures below. The first is under torture, and the second is eight days after torture:

guy_fawkes_torture_signaturestop-signature-of-guido-on-his-confession-under-torture-very-faint-and-shaky-bottom-signature-of-guido-fawkes-on-a-further-confession-8-days-after-being-tortured

X

On the 31st of January, 1606 Fawkes either fell or jumped from the platform where he was supposed to hang, and broke his neck before he could be executed as intended.

Today the 5th is celebrated in Britain with bonfires and fireworks as Guy Fawkes Night.