On this day: the death of Granny Smith

Granny_Smith Maria Ann Sherwood known as Granny Smith Granny Smith Apple Inventor 19th Century Victorian Australia Victorian Era

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Maria Ann Smith – known as Granny Smith – the creator of the green “Granny Smith” apple, died in the colony of New South Wales, Australia on the 9th of March, 1870.

In 1868 Smith was handed a box of French crab apples from Tasmania at a market in Sydney. After she used them for baking, she discovered a seed in the discarded peels had sprouted in a compost heap. She continued to tend it in its place near a creek.

After her death the property’s new owner marketed the fruit as “Granny Smith”.

Smith married in England, having eight children (who survived early childhood) before emigrating to Australia in 1838.

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On this day: the first woman nominated for US President

Victoria_Woodhull_by_Mathew_Brady_c1870 Victoria Claflin Woodhull, later Victoria Woodhull Martin (September 23, 1838 – June 9, 1927) was an American leader of the woman's suffrage mov

Portrait by Mathew Brady

On the 10th of May, 1872, for the first time in the history of the United States, a woman was nominated for President.

Victoria Woodhull, a leader in the women’s suffrage movement, was born in September, 1838. The legality of her nomination is disputed for a number of reasons, including the fact she was under the required minimum age of thirty-five at the time.

She was the candidate for the Equal Rights Party. Though she was unsuccessful, she tried again a number of times over the following couple of decades.

On this day: the world’s first passenger railway

Tram on the Swansea and Mumbles Railway in Wales 1897.

Photographed in 1897

On the 25th of March, 1807, the world’s first passenger railway opened in Britain.

Horsetrain_1870Horse-powered train on the Swansea and Mumbles Railway, Wales.

1870

The Swansea and Mumbles Railway operated in Wales until 1960. The passenger cars were originally pulled by horses before being changed to steam locomotives, and then finally to electric trams.

On this day: the founding of Helena, Montana.

On the 30th of October 1864, Helena, later Montana, USA’s capital, was officially founded.

Panorama of Helena, Montana, in 1870 (or possibly 1872, per other source).

Helena in either 1870 or 1872

The city was founded after the discovery of gold in the area in July the same year. A small group of men met and selected the name on the day of the official founding. By that time the town had grown to a population of more than two-hundred.

As it was the day before Halloween, other names that were suggested included Pumpkinville and Squashtown.

On this day: Tiffany Opens in 1837

On the 18th of September, 1837 Charles Lewis Tiffany and John B. Young opened their “stationery and fancy goods emporium” in New York City. Originally called “Tiffany, Young and Ellis” the name was changed to Tiffany & Company when Tiffany took control in 1853.

From then on, the company’s emphasis was on jewellery.

In 1870 they made their move to number 15 Union Square West, the building that can be seen in the picture below:

Tiffany & Company, storage area, circa 1887

761px-Tiffany_Co_Union_Square_1887

In the store circa 1887. On the left is Charles Lewis Tiffany.

(Notice how many women made it into the picture?!)

Charles Lewis Tiffany (left) in his store, about 1887