On this day: Xenophobia in America

This anti-Irish propaganda image was published in American magazine in Harper's Weekly on the 2nd of September, 1871. Created by famed German-born caricaturist Thomas Nast

This anti-Irish propaganda image was published in American magazine in Harper’s Weekly on the 2nd of September, 1871. Created by famed German-born caricaturist Thomas Nast, the man commonly credited with creating the modern-day image of Santa Claus, it was titled “The Usual Irish Way of Doing Things”.

On this day: a Centenary in Canada

Copy of a photograph of Mayor James Sharpe and his wife, Edie, taken in front of the memorial plaque in Centennial Park, Deseronto, Ontario, on the occasion of the celebration of the tow

Copy of a photograph of Mayor James Sharpe and Chief Earl Hill, taken in front of the memorial plaque in Centennial Park, Deseronto, Ontario, on the occasion of the celebration of the to

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Mayor James Sharpe, his wife Edie, and Chief Earl Hill pose in front of the plaque in Centennial Park on the hundredth anniversary of the founding of Deseronto, Ontario, Canada. 19th June 1971. The Sharpes wear 1870s clothing for the occasion.

Deseronto is named after Captain John Deseronto, a native Mohawk leader and a captain in the British Military Forces during the American Revolutionary War.

Guy Fawkes

Guy Fawkes Night is celebrated in Great Britain on the 5th of November. Below is an 1867 anti-Irish Guy Fawkes illustration from Punch magazine. Fenian refers to Irish nationalists.

punch_anti-irish_propaganda_1867_guy_fawkesanti-irish-propaganda-from-punch-magazine-published-in-december-1867

American magazine Harper’s Weekly ran a similar anti-Irish image, titled The Usual Irish Way of Doing Thingsin 1871.

theusualirishwayofdoingthingsanti-irish-political-cartoon-titled-the-usual-irish-way-of-doing-things-by-thomas-nast-1840-1902-published-in-harpers-weekly-on-2-september-1871

On this day: the opening of the Royal Albert Hall

RAH_Grand_Opening_by_Queen_Victoria_29_March_1871_The_GraphicThe grand opening of the Royal Albert Hall in London by Queen Victoria on 29 March 1871 as illustrated in The Graphic, an illustrated newspaper of the time.

The Graphic illustrates the opening performance.

The Royal Albert Hall in London, named in honour of Queen Victoria’s late husband, was opened on the 29th of March, 1871.

Prince Edward, the future king, gave the speech, as Victoria was said to be too overcome to talk.

A concert followed the opening speech.

On this day: the Peshtigo Fire

The Peshtigo Fire occurred on the 8th of October, 1871 in and around Peshtigo, Wisconsin. It was the deadliest fire in US history.

The Peshtigo Fire occurred on the 8th of October, 1871 in and around Peshtigo, Wisconsin. It was the deadliest fire in US history.

Because a number of fires struck the United States on the same day that year this one is largely forgotten, overshadowed by the far more famous – but not as deadly – Great Chicago Fire.

The 1871 Peshtigo Fire in Wisconsin and Michigan

The Peshtigo fire took at least 1500 lives, but may have taken as many as 2500. It is hard to determine an exact number, as local records were destroyed in the disaster.

Peshtigo 1871 before te fire 19th century su history wisconsin

Peshtigo shortly before the fire.

As with many fires around that time – and just as it is today – the cause was a combination of drought, hot temperatures and strong winds, joining to create a firestorm. However there is little specific detail available, and what information there is available is largely from journal entries of the time.