On this day: Market Day in Ireland

Would_have_been_perfect_if_the_Butcher's_Shop_was_called_Hazlett!_(9553954028)Very patiently queueing horses at the Market Square in Dromore, Co. Down. Ireland Edwardian Northern Ireland

From the National Library of Ireland

This photograph is thought to be from Sunday the 9th of October, 1904. Horses wait in a queue in the market town of Dromore in County Down.

Dromore is now in Northern Ireland.

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On this day: the sinking of the SS Norge

SS Norge was a Danish passenger liner sailing from Copenhagen, Kristiania and Kristiansand to New York, mainly with emigrants, which sank off Rockall in 1904.

SS Norge in the late nineteenth century. X

On the 28th of June, 1904 Danish passenger liner SS Norge ran aground near Rockall in the North Atlantic Ocean and sank.

Rockall is an uninhabited granite islet within the exclusive economic zone (EEZ) of the United Kingdom.

Over 635 people died, with the highest number of victims coming from Norway.

The liner sank twelve minutes after the accident, pulling many who had tried to jump to safety underwater with it, and drowning them.

Herman Wildenvey (20 July 1885 – 27 September 1959), born Herman Theodor Portaas, was one of the most prominent Norwegian poets of the twentieth century.

Herman Wildenvey

Those who survived were saved by British and German ships. One of the survivors was Norwegian poet Herman Wildenvey.

On this day: New York’s first subway line opened

On the 27th of October, 1904, New York’s first subway line opened. It came three and a half decades after the city’s first elevated train was run. The first day of the subway line saw more than 150 000 passengers pay $0.05 for a journey on the train.

City Hall subway station.

On the 27th of October, 1904, New York’s first subway line opened. It came three and a half decades after the city’s first elevated train was run.751px-City_Hall_Subway_station

On this day: Russia’s Lithuanian press ban was lifted

3Imposed by the Russian Empire, Lithuanian language publication was banned from the early 1860s through to the 24th of April, 1904.80px-Auksa_altorius_latinImposed by the Russian Empire, Lithuanian language publication was banned from the early 1860s through to the 24th of April, 1904.368px-Auksa_altorius_cirillics

Illegal and legal versions of the same prayer book.

Imposed by the Russian Empire, Lithuanian language publication in Lithuania was banned for some forty years, and finally lifted on the 24th of April, 1904.

This was one of many attempts to stop the rise of nationalism throughout the non-Russian regions of the Russian Empire.

The ban made it illegal to print, import, distribute or possess any publications in the Latin alphabet.