On this day: a Crime in North East England

James_Waters_alias_Joseph_Turnbull,_arrested_for_housebreaking_25 September 1906At North Shields Police Court today, James Turnbull, alias Waters, a young man, was charged with breaking

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On the 25th of September, 1906 in North East England a young man named James Waters was arrested for housebreaking.

The story that appeared in the Shields Daily News is below. It should be noted that the word “prosecutrix” – a word relating to female victims who prosecute – is no longer recognised by spell-checks.

HOUSEBREAKING AT NORTH SHIELDS. ACCUSED COMMITTED FOR TRIAL.
At North Shields Police Court today, James Turnbull, alias Waters, a young man, was charged with breaking and entering the dwelling-house, no. 2 Camp Terrace, and stealing a silver serviette ring, a lady’s silver watch, a silver spoon, a ring, bracelet, and locket, the property of Eliz. Jackson.
Richard Appleby-Jackson, an articled clerk and estate agent residing at no. 2 Camp Terrace, said that on the 29th Aug. last he and the other members of the family left home and returned on the 12th Sept, finding that it had been broken into, and that a number of articles valued at £4 8s had been stolen. On the 20th inst., from what he was told, he went to the police station and there identified a serviette ring, a watch, a spoon, and other articles as the property of his mother.
Anna Ramsey, residing in Howard Street, said that while the prosecutrix was from home she kept the keys of the house. On the 4th Sept she went there for the purpose of watering the plants and found everything in order. She locked the house up before she left, everything then being secure. She returned three days later and found the house in a state of disorder.
Mary Isabel Davies, a cook in the employ of the prosecutrix, said that while her mistress was away she went to live in Bedford Street. On the 6th Sept she obtained the keys from the last witness in order to do some cleaning. She went next day, and was unable to open the front door because the chain on the inside had been put on, and she was obliged to get assistance in order to force an entrance. When she went into the house everything was in a state of disorder and she immediately informed the police.
Michael D. Hart, dealer in second-hand goods, 120 Pilgrim Street, Newcastle, stated that on the 7th inst. the prisoner came to his shop and offered to sell the locket, bracelet and ring produced, which he said belonged to his wife, and upon which he wished to raise some money, that he was out of employment. Witness gave 5s for them. Accused also offered to sell a silver serviette ring, a spoon, and a brooch, which witness declined to buy.
A watchmaker and jeweller, belonging to West Hartlepool, said that on Sept 8th the prisoner came to his shop and offered the serviette ring, photo frame and spoon for sale, saying he was “hard up”. Witness bought the articles for 4s. Later in the day he returned with a lady’s silver watch and offered to dispose of it for 10s. It was, however, defective and he accordingly declined to buy it.
Detective Radcliffe deposed to visiting the house in Camp Terrace on the 7th inst and finding the house in a state of disorder. The door leading from the front to the back of the house was fastened and he had to climb through the serving aperture in order to get to the kitchen.
Detective Inspector Thornton said that on the 14th inst. he went to West Hartlepool Police Station, where the serviette ring, spoon, photo frame, and watch were handed to him in the presence of the accused, who said they were the things he got from a house in North Shields. Witness told him there was a ring, a locket and bracelet missing from the same house. Prisoner replied that he sold them to a second-hand dealer in Pilgrim Street, Newcastle. On being charged this morning the prisoner made no reply.
Formally charged by the Clerk (Col. R. F. Kidd), prisoner had still nothing to say. He was committed for trial at the Quarter Sessions.

 

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April 1906: the aftermath of a disaster

A massive earthquake hit San Francisco, USA on the 18th of April, 1906. The fires that it sparked lasted days and devastated the city.

This image shows the community rallying together in the middle of the destruction.

5 Times San Francisco Was Almost Destroyed

On April 18, 1906, one of the worst natural disasters in the history of the United States shook San Francisco. Though the quake was bad, 80 percent of the city was destroyed by the fires

March 1906: Destruction in Yorkshire

The seaside resort of Hornsea in East Riding of Yorkshire, England was devastated by storms in March of 1906. The timber defences along the coastline were destroyed, and much of the beach was swept away.

Around 1907 work began on a new seawall. It can be seen completed in the second image, taken in 1910.

Hornsea_seafront_1906_after_storm_and_1910_after_construction_of_sea_wall Hornsea seafront 1906 after storm and 1910 after construction of sea wall 1912 book. the East Riding of Yorkshir

On this day: the opening of Sydney’s Central Station

centRail06 Sydney Central Railway Station —First Locomotive at new station 4th August 1906. Anchor series..

The first locomotive. 4th August, 1906. X

The official opening for Central Railway Station in Sydney, Australia was held on the 4th of August, 1906.

centRail03 Central Station Sydney opened in 1906. —Original wooden booking hall 1906.

The old booking hall in 1906, the year the station opened. X

The station opened to passengers the following day.

719px-Laying_the_foundation_stone,_Central_Station_1903_(5207836628)Laying the foundation stone for Central Railway Station, Sydney Dated 26-9-1903.

Laying the foundation stone in 1903. X

Replacing previous stations in the city, Central was built on land that belonged to a number of businesses and charities including a female refuge and a police station.

The Devonshire Street Cemetery was located between Eddy Avenue and Elizabeth Street, and between Chalmers and Devonshire Streets, at Brickfield Hill, in Sydney, Australia. Photographed in 1902.

Devonshire Street Cemetery in 1902 X

The site had also been home to the Devonshire Street Cemetery. Families of people buried there were given two months to move their relatives’ bodies.

The San Francisco Earthquake

An earthquake hit San Francisco on the 18th of April, 1906. Amongst the buildings damaged or destroyed was the famous Fairmont Hotel, which was gutted by a fire following the quake.

It is photographed below after the damage was done.

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fairmont2 The Fairmont San Francisco View from Jackson & Mason Streets after the 1906 Fire