Christmas 1914

The_Christmas_Truce_on_the_Western_Front,_1914_Q50721British and German officers meeting in No-Man's Land during the unofficial truce. (British troops from the Northumberland Hussars, 7t

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25th December 1914: British and German officers pose for a photograph in No-Man’s Land during the famous unofficial Christmas truce in the first year of World War One.

For one day soldiers put down their weapons and celebrated the holiday with their enemies.

The British officers pictured here are from the  Northumberland Hussars, 7th Division, Bridoux-Rouge Banc Sector.

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On this day: Australian soldiers off to war

“E”_Company_at_Fort_Macquarie_October_18th,_1914_(18663775908) Syndey New South Wales Australia First World One World War One

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This photograph is titled:

“E” Company at Fort Macquarie October 18th, 1914.

Fort Macquarie, in the Australian state of New South Wales, was located at Bennelong Point, where the Sydney Opera House stands today.

Australia committed to the First World War from the outset, with preparations beginning even before Britain declared war on Germany in early August of 1914.

On this day: Troops on the March

The_Race_To_the_Sea,_September-october_1914_First World War 5th October 1914 French Cavalry passing the 1st Battalion, Cameronians (Scottish Rifles), with the rest of the 19th Brigade, t

The march to the sea. First World War.

5th October 1914: French Cavalry on the march pass troops of the 1st Battalion, Cameronians (Scottish Rifles). The British soldiers slept hidden during the day and marched at night.

Germany had declared war on France two months earlier. The photograph is credited to British Army officer Robert Cotton Money (1888-1985).

On this day: Australians off to war.

Australian Imperial Force's 2nd Infantry Brigade marching through Bourke Street, Melbourne, Friday, 25th September 1914. First World War. World War One.

This photograph – dated the 25th of September, 1914 – shows the Australian Imperial Force’s 2nd Infantry Brigade marching down Bourke Street, Melbourne.

Australia was involved in the First World War from the outset. 38.7 percent of the country’s eligible male population enlisted in the war – a war taking place on the other side of the world. At this point in time Australia considered itself very British.

 

On this day: Australia at the outbreak of war.

Parade of Queensland Expeditionary Force through the streets of Brisbane, 14 September 1914. Australia. First World War.

Seven weeks after the outbreak of the First World War, and six weeks after Britain – and therefore Australia – declared war on Germany, a military parade took place in the streets of Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. It was the 14th of September, 1914.

Featured prominently in this postcard image are the Light Horsemen, who played a significant role in Australia’s participation in the war.

On this day: human rights in Canada

Ukrainians in Castle Mountain concentration camp in 1915.

The 22nd of August, 1914 saw the passing of Canada’s War Measures Act. The act would result in government-sanctioned human rights abuses against Canadians of largely Ukrainian origin.

Ukrainians were declared “enemy aliens” and thousands were put into concentration camps to be used for slave labour across Canada. They were seen as enemies because the western regions of their homeland were under Austro-Hungarian rule at the outbreak of the First World War.

Some 80 000 Ukrainians who weren’t imprisoned were still required to register as enemy aliens and barred from leaving the country.

Plaque and statue at Castle Mountain near Banff.

The infamous Castle Mountain Internment Camp in Alberta saw prisoners used to work in the national parks, where they established the groundwork for the massive tourism to Banff and Lake Louise seen today.

Abuses at the camp were widespread, and were reported as far away as Britain.

Internment continued for two years after the war ended.

Kapuskasing_ON_3The Ukrainian cemetery at the Kapuskasing Internment Camp a concentration camp for mostly ethnic Ukrainians imprisoned to be used for slave labour during the First Wor

Ukrainian cemetery at the Kapuskasing Internment Camp in Ontario.

The internment of ethnic groups was widespread across many countries in both the First and Second World Wars, including in Australia and the United States, though the internment of Japanese Americans in the 1940s is generally the only instance most know of.

On this day: the British Empire declares war

Enlisting for World War I. Recruiting Officer (beside flag ) with volunteers and their relatives and friends. Babe Cooper (second from the left of recruiting officer.) Jerseyville, NSW A

The British Empire entered the First World War on the 4th of August, 1914, with a declaration of war on the German Empire.

This declaration drew Britain’s territories overseas into the conflict, including Australia.

This image is of a military recruitment station in the Australian village of Jerseyville, New South Wales. The Recruitment Officer (beside the flag), new recruits, and their families pose for a photograph, circa 1914.