On this day: Lord Kitchener reviews troops

Field Marshal Lord Kitchener reviewing 10th (Irish) Division at Basingstoke 1st June 1915. End of June received orders to depart from Hampshire for Gallipoli. First World War One.

1st June 1915: Herbert Kitchener, 1st Earl Kitchener – the famous Lord Kitchener of the World War One recruitment poster – is seen here reviewing the 10th (Irish) Division in Basingstoke, England.

Later that month the troops received their orders to depart for the infamous Gallipoli Campaign.

Herbert Kitchener, 1st Earl Kitchener - the famous Lord Kitchener of the World War One recruitment poster. British.

Kitchener was killed by a German mine the following year, while travelling to Russia aboard the HMS Hampshire.

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On this day: a truce is called

This image, taken on the 24th of May, 1915, shows Australian and Turkish troops collecting the dead after a nine-hour truce was called at the Gallipoli Peninsula in Turkey.

After an attack from the Turks five days earlier that left more than 3000 dead, the stench became so strong both sides agreed to remove the bodies.

The fighting in Turkey came to be commemorated in Australia and New Zealand as Anzac Day on the 25th of April each year.

Anzac_truce_24_May_1915 Scene in no man's land at Anzac during the truce of 24 May 1915, organised to bury the Turkish dead from the attack of 19 May, in which an estimated 3,000 men wer

On this day: the death of a soldier

Light_horse_walersAustralian Imperial Force prior to their departure from Australia in November 1914. right is Trooper William Harry Rankin Woods, 1st Light Horse Regiment, who died of w

Trooper William Harry Rankin

From the collection of the Australian War Memorial, Canberra.

The Australian Imperial Force, the Australian Army’s expeditionary force in the First World War, was formed in August of 1914. The mounted Australian Light Horse made up part of this force.

This photograph was taken in November, 1914. The troops – both lighthorsemen – would soon leave Australia to fight.

Trooper William Harry Rankin is pictured on the right. He would go on to fight at Gallipoli in the Ottoman Empire, where he was killed on the 15th of May, 1915.

Rankin, from the New South Wales town of Mudgee, was thirty-nine at the time of his death.

On this day: Australian Soldiers in Egypt

Group portrait of the Australian 11th (Western Australia) Battalion, 3rd Infantry Brigade, Australian Imperial Force posing on the Great Pyramid of Giza on 10 January 1915, prior to the

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10th January 1915: Members of the Australian 11th (Western Australia) Battalion, 3rd Infantry Brigade, Australian Imperial Force pose for a group photograph on the Great Pyramid of Giza in Egypt. The Australians did a lot of their training in the country.

In April of the same year they would take part in the infamous landings at Gallipoli in the Ottoman Empire (modern-day Turkey). 378 men in this battalion were amongst the 26 111 Australian casualties, which included 8141 deaths.

On this day: the death of a war hero

Only hours after being awarded the French Légion d_honneur, British Lieutenant Reginald Warneford was killed in an aeroplane crash on the 17th of June, 1915.

Only hours after being awarded the French Légion d’honneur, British Lieutenant Reginald Warneford was killed in an aeroplane crash on the 17th of June, 1915.

Lieutenant_Warneford's_Great_Exploit-_the_first_Zeppelin_to_be_brought_down_by_Allied_aircraft,_7th_June_1915__the_Vc_was_conferred_at_once_on_Lieutenant_Warneford__Art_IWMART307

A 1919 painting depicting the moment the Zeppelin was brought down.

Only twenty-three at the time of his accident, Warneford, a member of the Royal Naval Air Service had been hailed a hero ten days earlier when he’d brought down a German Zeppelin in the First World War.

After the presentation ceremony and reception Warneford was transporting American journalist Henry Beach Newman from an aerodrome at Buc when the plane crashed, killing both passengers. Newman died instantly, while Warneford died of his injuries shortly afterwards.

The funeral took place in July. X

In addition to his French award, he was also given the Victoria Cross.

On this day: a Zeppelin falls

This 1919 image captures the moment British Lieutenant Reginald Warneford famously brought down a German Zeppelin on the 7th of June, 1915.

Warneford, a member of the Royal Naval Air Service in the First World War, was awarded the French Légion d’honneur ten days later – and died in an aeroplane crash that afternoon.

Lieutenant_Warneford's_Great_Exploit-_the_first_Zeppelin_to_be_brought_down_by_Allied_aircraft,_7th_June_1915__the_Vc_was_conferred_at_once_on_Lieutenant_Warneford__Art_IWMART307