On this day: British troops in France

British air mechanics work on wrecked fuselages on the 12th of July, 1918, as the First World War neared its end. The image was taken at the aircraft repair depot near Rang-du-Fliers in the north of France.

From the collection of the Imperial War Museums.

The_Royal_Flying_Corps_on_the_Western_Front,_1914-1918_Q12073 British air mechanics working on wrecked fuselages at the aircraft repair depot near Rang du Fliers, 12th July 1918.

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On this day: an anniversary of women at war

7th July 1918: British members of the Women’s Army Auxiliary Corps work on a car in Étaples, France.

Exactly one year earlier the WAAC was formed as the women’s unit of the British Army. In the final sixteen months of the First World War some 57 000 women served.

THE WOMEN'S ARMY AUXILIARY CORPS ON THE WESTERN FRONT, 1917-1918. Fitters of the WAAC at work on a car at Etaples, 7 July 1918.

100 Years Ago: Britain’s Deadliest Explosion

Women_at_work_during_the_First_World_War-_Munitions_Production,_Chilwell,_Nottinghamshire,_England,_UK,_c_1917_Q30011A Around 21 August, 1917

The factory in August of 1917.

On the 1st of July, 1918, the deadliest explosion in British history occurred near Chilwell in Nottinghamshire, England.

The disaster happened at National Filling Factory No. 6, a First World War munitions factory that had been in operation since 1915. The factory was known for its “Canary girls“: women shell makers.

Female munitions workers guide 6 inch howitzer shells being lowered to the floor at the Chilwell ammunition factory in Nottinghamshire, UK. July 1917.

“Canary Girls”

On the day of the disaster eight tons of TNT blew up, killing 134 people and injuring 250 others, however newspapers at the time reported a much lower death toll.

The site of the factory is now home to Chetwynd Barracks.

100 Years Ago in Ukraine

The city of Yekaterinoslav, Ukraine from the air in spring of 1918.

Under the Soviets the city was renamed Dnipropetrovsk, after a Communist leader responsible for engineering the Holodomor, the genocide of some ten million Ukrainians in the 1930s.

Following Ukraine’s 2013-14 revolution and the Russian invasion that followed, the local government renamed the city Dnipro.

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Aerial_photograph,_Ukrainian_city_of_Yekaterinoslav,_now_called_Dnipropetrovs'k_(8694217284) Dnipro Spring 1918

Aerial_photograph,_Ukrainian_city_of_Yekaterinoslav,_now_called_Dnipropetrovs'k_(8693099403) Dnipro Spring 1918

Australian “Soldiers”

Boys and girls dressed as soldiers, with slouch hats and toy rifles, at Irvinebank, Queensland, Australia around 1917. First World War.

Source

This image of boys and girls dressed as Australian soldiers was taken in the small far-north Queensland town of Irvinebank around 1917.

Henry Dalziel, a recipient of the Victoria Cross after World War One, was born in the town in 1893.

Australia began preparations for the war even before Britain officially joined the conflict in 1914. So closely tied to Britain, and still part of the Empire, Australia was part of the conflict until its conclusion on the 11th of November, 1918.

On this day: an Ammunition Plant Explosion

GillespieExplosion Man standing in a large crater from T. A. Gillespie Company Shell Loading Plant explosion in Sayreville, New Jersey. October 1918. World War One.

A man stands in the crater left by the explosion. October 1918.

Disaster struck New Jersey, USA on the 4th of October, 1918, when an explosion hit the T. A. Gillespie Company Shell Loading Plant. The First World War munitions plant, one of the largest in the world, was hit by a large explosion that started a fire and went on to trigger more explosions over the next two days.

The plant itself, as well as some three-hundred other buildings, were destroyed.

Because employment records were destroyed in the explosion the exact death toll is unclear, however it is believed to be around a hundred. Hundreds of other people were injured.

Residents of Morgan NJ in flight along the road to Perth Amboy and safety from the series of great explosions which destroyed the Shell-loading Plant of T. A. Gillespie & Company. Octobe

Residents being evacuated.

The disaster is generally believed to be an accident.

About a century later, the area is still affected by explosive substances.

On this day: Australian troops in Damascus, Syria.

The caption for this photograph (as written by the Australian War Memorial, Canberra) is as below:

The Turkish Hospital in Damascus on 1 October 1918, shortly after the entry of the Australian 4th Light Horse Regiment.

To read more about this complicated point in Syrian and Middle Eastern history, you can begin HERE.

4ALHinDamascus The Turkish Hospital in Damascus on 1 October 1918, shortly after the entry of the Australian 4th Light Horse Regiment.