On this day: Air Raid Damage in Australia

8th October 1942: A house at Myilly Point in Darwin in Australia’s Northern Territory destroyed by a Japanese air raid.

Australia was bombed in about a hundred separate air raids between 1942 and 1943 during the Second World War.

From the collection of the Australian War Memorial, Canberra.

Remains of a house at Myilly Point in Darwin damaged in a Japaneses Air Raid. 8th October 1942 Northern Territory Australia Second World War Two

On this day: a Finnish concentration camp.

24th April 1942: Soviet women eat their breakfast next to a burning pile of rubbish in a Finnish concentration camp in Petrozavodsk, Karelia. The photograph was taken during the Continuation War, during World War Two, when Finland and Nazi Germany fought together against mostly Soviet troops.

Soviet women having breakfast next to a burning pile of rubbish at a Finnish concentration camp in Petrozavodsk, Karelia, during the Continuation War. 24th April 1942. Second World War T

On this day: Air Raid Damage in Australia

2nd April 1943: A house in Darwin in Australia’s Northern Territory is severely damaged by a Japanese air raid.

Australia was bombed in about a hundred separate air raids between 1942 and 1943 during the Second World War.

From the collection of the Australian War Memorial, Canberra.

Damaged_house_(Darwin)A house in Darwin damaged in a Japaneses Air Raid. Northern Territory, Australia. Second World War Two. Bombing of Darwin.

On this day: Churchill’s Grandson at Christmas

'English Father Christmas' presents Winston Churchill Jr., the Prime Minister's grandson, with a gift at a Christmas party at Admiralty House in London, 17 December 1942.'Father Christma

Source

17th December 1942: Father Christmas presents British Prime Minister Winston Churchill’s grandson – also named Winston – with a book of nursery rhymes for Christmas at a function at Admiralty House in London. The younger Winston was two at the time.

The younger Winston went on to become a Conservative politician. He married twice, had four children, and died of cancer in his late-sixties in 2010.

Eighty Years Ago: Australia’s Women’s National Emergency Legion is Formed

Horsewoman in the Australian Women’s Emergency Legion. September 1939. X

The Women’s National Emergency Legion, an auxiliary organisation in Australia during the Second World War, was formed in September of 1938.

Based in Brisbane, Queensland, only women of British origin were allowed to join.

Article from The Morning Bulletin. Rockhampton. 18 November 1938.

Women considered eligible were provided with training in areas considered necessary to the war effort, such as first aid and truck driving.

Miss Tony Mitchell at Somerville House in Brisbane, 1942. Mitchell drove cars and trucks for the US Army. X

When war broke out in the Pacific at the end of 1941 women were attached to US military units to work as drivers and clerks. They also worked for British and Dutch units based in Australia.

The organisation ceased operations a couple of years after the end of the war.

On this day: the Australian Women’s Land Army is formed

AWLA_smoko_timeGroup of women from the Australian Women's Land Army smoking at tea break, seated on dry grass out in the country in the height of summer. Tent, trees and clouds in backgr

 Smoko time with the AWLA

Inspired by Britain’s Women’s Land Army, the Australian Women’s Land Army was created on the 27th of July, 1942. The organisation was formed to combat shortages in the farming industry as the Second World War intensified.

Though Australia had been fighting in the war since 1939, once Japan entered the conflict in 1941, threatening the Pacific, many Australian men were drafted into the army, leaving shortages at home.

A_papier-mache_cow_on_Mrs_Mellor_s_car,_1944A papier-mache cow, used for milking demonstrations at the Werribee experimental farm, Women's Land Army Australia Seconnd World War World W

Field Officer Mrs Mellor ties a papier-mâché cow used in milking demonstrations to the back of her car in Melbourne. 1944.

Women who joined the AWLA took over men’s jobs in the agricultural sector. In order to be eligible for the work women were required to be between eighteen and fifty, and to be either of British origin or to be from a member of the Allied nations.

Women were paid significantly less than men for the same work.

The AWLA was disbanded on the 31st of December, 1945.

On this day: Soldiers are Welcomed Home

Adelaide, SA. 14 March 1942. Troops of the 7th Australian Division receive a welcome from the people of the suburbs of Adelaide as they pass through on their way to Adelaide from the doc

From the collection of the Australian War Memorial, Canberra.

This image, dated the 14th of March, 1942, shows a train of soldiers of the 7th Division being welcomed home by women and children in the suburbs of Adelaide, South Australia. They had just disembarked from His Majesty’s Transport Orcades and were returning from fighting in the Middle East.

This division of the Australian Army was formed in February of 1940, as part of the Second Australian Imperial Force in the Second World War.