On this day: a memorial service in Korea

WAR & CONFLICT BOOK ERA: KOREAN WAR/DEATH & DESTRUCTION

Source

3rd December 1950: A wounded chaplain is photographed conducting a memorial service over the snow-covered bodies of dead US Marines.

The image was taken during the Battle of Chosin Reservoir in the Korean War.

On this day: Australians in Korea

7th November 1950 Troops from C Company, 3rd Battalion, The Royal Australian Regiment (3RAR), watch for the enemy while a village in the valley below burns. The village was set on fire b

A village in a Korean valley burns on the 7th of November, 1950 as troops from C Company, 3rd Battalion, The Royal Australian Regiment (3RAR) look on. They are searching for enemy soldiers.

17 000 Australians served in the Korean War between 1950 and 1953.

The image is from the collection of the Australian War Memorial, Canberra.

On this day: Seoul in Ruins

WAR & CONFLICT BOOK
ERA:  KOREAN WAR/DEATH & DESTRUCTION

This photograph, dated the 1st of November, 1950, is from the US Army archives and shows an elderly woman searching through the rubble of Seoul over four months into the Korean War.

It would be more than three years between the beginning of the war and the 1953 armistice. However, Korea remains divided.

On this day: the USS Missouri aground

21st of January, 1950, and shows US Navy battleship USS Missouri (BB-63) four days after running aground near Thimble Shoal Light in Virginia, USA.

This photograph is from the 21st of January, 1950, and shows US Navy battleship USS Missouri (BB-63) four days after running aground near Thimble Shoal Light in Virginia, USA. She was trapped there until the 1st of February, when she was refloated and repaired.

The Missouri is famous for being the site of the surrender of the Empire of Japan in 1945, ending the Second World War.

In the years following the accident in Virginia, the ship was used in the Korean and Gulf Wars before being transformed into a museum ship at Pearl Harbor.

On this day: the opening of the Sands Hotel and Casino

The Sands Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas, Nevada opened on the 15th of December, 1952.

The Sands was one of the city’s famous hotels, regularly hosting stars like Frank Sinatra and Dean Martin.

The complex was demolished in 1996 and is now home to The Venetian.

This advertisement for The Sands appeared on the 27th of December, 1952.

Source

Sands_opening_ad_Billboard_1952Opening of the Sands Hotel & Casino in Las Vegas-ad in Billboard December 27, 1952.

On this day: Spinsters Are Wonderful People

On the 10th of May, 1958, the Australian Catholic Truth Society released a pamphlet titled: Spinsters Are Wonderful People: In Praise of Unmarried Women.

Spinsters Are Wonderful People In Praise of Unmarried Women. The Australian Catholic Truth Society. 10th May 1958 Daniel A. Lord, S.J..

It seems this pamphlet may have been produced a number of times, as a version dated 1950 can be read HERE.

An excerpt:

THE CHURCH MAKES A CHANGE

Whatever literature may say about spinsters, and however much history may ignore them – except for outstanding spinsters like Elizabeth of England – the Church’s attitude toward unmarried women has been, from the first, one of reverence. This I came to know when my faith emerged from mere youthful practice to intelligent study and appreciation. Among the Jews a spinster was merely an unfortunate girl not lucky enough to have won a husband for herself. Among the pagans she was usually the slave or bondmaiden, the grudgingly tolerated hanger-on in the house of her parents or her luckier married sisters.

With St. Paul all that was changed. He loved virginity, and he turned to the ministrations and loyalty – as many a parish has done since – of the splendid young and older unmarried women of his time. The legends of St. Paul and St. Tecla – whose name was the Greek word for pearl – are many and beautiful. Phoebe, to whom Paul sends affectionate messages, seems to have been one of the first consecrated Catholic virgins.