On this day: a Rail Disaster in London

 

The scene looking south over the aftermath of the Harrow and Wealdstone train crash on 8 October 1952. The United Kingdom's worst peacetime rail disaster.

The United Kingdom’s worst peacetime rail disaster occurred at London’s Harrow and Wealdstone station on the 8th of October, 1952.

The scene looking south over the aftermath of the Harrow and Wealdstone train crash on 8 October 1952.Rescue workers around wrecked coaches after the Harrow and Wealdstone train crash on

112 people were killed when the City of Glasgow – an express train from Perth, Scotland – crashed into the back of a local passenger train at rush hour. The wreckage covered other rail lines, resulting in a third train – another express – to crash.

The scene looking south over the aftermath of the Harrow and Wealdstone train crash on 8 October 1952. The badly damaged locomotive of the Perth express train No. 46242 Coronation Class

The wrecked City of Glasgow.

In addition to over a hundred deaths, 340 other people were injured, with 88 transported to hospital for treatment.

The overturned second Liverpool locomotive No. 46202 and wrecked coaches after the Harrow and Wealdstone train crash on 8 October 1952.

An investigation found that the driver of the Perth train missed three signals before crashing, but as those involved were killed, the reason for this was never discovered.

On this day…

A U.S. Navy McDonnell F2H-2 Banshee flies over Wonsan on the 20th of October 1952. Korean War.
F2H-2_VF-11_CVA-33_1952 US Navy Korean War 20th October 1952 over Wonsan

On this day…

Dancers from the London Festival Ballet on the 31st of May, 1952. They are photographed on London’s Southbank.

The company was renamed the English National Ballet in 1989, and is today home to some of the world’s most famous ballet stars, many of them from overseas.

Source

southbank-centre-7-1444132505-view-0 Cast members of the Festival Ballet, captured mid-leap on London's Southbank, 31 May 1952.

On this day: Magdeburg in Ruins

This image of the German city of Magdeburg was taken on the 29th of May, 1952, seven years after the end of the Second World War.

Trapped behind the Iron Curtain, as the city was occupied by the Soviets at the end of the war (and the region turned into East Germany), very few of the city’s pre-war buildings were ever restored. Many were left in their bombed state or simply abandoned for years before being pulled down.

Source

Magdeburg, Blick auf die zerstörte Altstadt

On this day: Russia’s mass deportations of the Baltic peoples began.

Estonian children who had been forcibly deported to Siberia by Russian authorities. 1952.

Estonian children in Siberia in 1952

Operation Priboi (“Coastal Surf”) was the code name for the Soviet mass deportation from the Baltic states on 25–28 March 1949. The action is also known as the March deportation by Baltic historians. More than 90,000 Estonians, Latvians and Lithuanians, labeled as enemies of the people, were deported to forced settlements in inhospitable areas of the Soviet Union.

Over 70% of the deportees were women and children under the age of 16.

On this day: the opening of the Sands Hotel and Casino

The Sands Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas, Nevada opened on the 15th of December, 1952.

The Sands was one of the city’s famous hotels, regularly hosting stars like Frank Sinatra and Dean Martin.

The complex was demolished in 1996 and is now home to The Venetian.

This advertisement for The Sands appeared on the 27th of December, 1952.

Source

Sands_opening_ad_Billboard_1952Opening of the Sands Hotel & Casino in Las Vegas-ad in Billboard December 27, 1952.