On this day: A Protest in Washington

Impeach_Nixon_retouched 22nd October 1973 Impreach Nixon Watergate scandal 1970s Washington D.C.

This photograph, dated the 22nd of October, 1973 shows people demonstrating in Washington D.C., calling for the impeachment of US President Richard Nixon.

The protest came in the middle of the Watergate scandal, when Nixon lied about his involvement in the break-in at the Democratic National Committee headquarters.

This was less than two weeks after the resignation of Vice President Agnew because of criminal charges of bribery, tax evasion and money laundering. Agnew was later convicted.

Nixon resigned in August of 1974 to avoid almost certain impeachment.

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On this day: a President Resigns

Oliver F. Atkins' photo of Nixon leaving the White House shortly before his resignation became effective, 9th August 1974.

These images, taken by Oliver F. Atkins on the 9th of August, 1974, show US President Richard Nixon leaving the White House after resigning. The resignation came into effect shortly after.

Nixon-departOliver F. Atkins_ photo of Nixon leaving the White House on Marine One shortly before his resignation became effective, August 9, 1974.

Republican Nixon gave up the Presidency following the Watergate scandal, in which he tried to cover up his involvement in a break-in at the Democratic National Committee headquarters.

On this day: the Irish government stands up to the Catholic Church

On the 12th of March, 1985, the government of the Republic of Ireland finally stood up to the powerful Catholic Church and legalised contraception.

feminists-on-the-platform-of-connolly-station-dublin-in-1971-prior-to-boarding-the-belfast-train-contraceptive-train-contraception-illegal-in-the-republic-of-ireland

Women leave Dublin on their protest journey to Belfast.

The 1970s saw feminists travelling to Belfast in Northern Ireland and returning home with contraceptives, risking arrest for importing illegal products. They were met by protestors upon their arrival home.

Illegal in the Republic in all circumstances until 1980, a new law allowed some contraception to be dispensed by a pharmacist to people with a doctor’s prescription.

This highly restrictive law was finally changed five years later, despite conservative opposition.

american-letter-to-complain-about-womens-rights-and-ireland-legalising-contraception

Some Americans were so outraged that “Holy Ireland” now allowed contraception, they wrote to the Prime Minister to complain.

Even so, advertising of contraceptives was still banned, and Ireland continued to have one of the highest birth rates in the developed world.