On this day: America’s most lopsided football game

On the 7th of October, 1916, a college football game was played between Cumberland and Georgia Tech in Atlanta, USA. Tech on the left. Score 0 - 222

The infamous game. Georgia Tech on the left. Source.

On the 7th of October, 1916, a college football game was played between Cumberland and Georgia Tech in Atlanta, USA.

GT_Cumberland_222_scoreboardScoreboard at the end of the 1916 Cumberland vs. Georgia Tech football game.

The final scoreboard.

Cumberland, from Tennessee, failed to score at all, leading the most lopsided score in the history of the sport: 0 – 222. The college had already discontinued its football program, but were not allowed to back out of the game.

The twentieth anniversary of the Atlanta Olympics bombing.

Flags fly at half-mast at the 1996 Atlanta Olympics after two were killed and 111 injured in a bombing for an anti-abortion and anti-gay agenda.

Olympic Park in Atlanta, Georgia, USA was bombed on the 27th of July, 1996. Two people were killed and 111 injured when Eric Robert Rudolph placed a US military pack containing three pipe bombs surrounded by nails in the so-called “town square” of the Olympic venue.

He later said he committed the attack because he didn’t agree with women having the right to abortion.

Atlanta_Olympic_Park_Bomb_AftermathFlags fly at half-mast at the 1996 Atlanta Olympics after two were killed and 111 injured in a bombing for an anti-abortion and anti-gay agenda.

Rudolph later confessed to the bombings of women’s health clinics and gay bars.

On this day: the Winecoff Hotel fire

The Winecoff Hotel fire of December 7, 1946 was the deadliest hotel fire in United States history, killing 119 hotel occupants, including the hotel's owners. Daisy B. McCumber

Daisy B. McCumber jumps from the hotel. She sustained serious lifelong injuries, but survived.

On the 7th of December, 1946, a fire broke out at the Winecoff Hotel in Atlanta, Georgia. Killing 119 people, including the owners, it is the deadliest hotel fire in US history.

Hotel guests found themselves unable to escape, and some tied bed sheets together to try and get to the bottom of the fifteen-floor building. However, the sheets broke. Fire fighters were hampered by falling bodies, causing them injuries.

Of the dead, thirty-two died by falling, including those who misjudged the distance to the next roof and tried to jump across.