On this day: an assassination attempt in Belgium

Assassination_attempt_on_king_Leopold_II_of_Belgium_in_Bruxelles_1902Italian anarchist Gennaro Rubino tried - and failed to assassinate Belgian King Leopold II in Brussels on the 15th of

Italian anarchist Gennaro Rubino tried – and failed to assassinate Belgian King Leopold II in Brussels on the 15th of November, 1902.

1902Italian anarchist Gennaro Rubino tried - and failed to assassinate Belgian King Leopold II in Brussels on the 15th of November, 1902. Gennaro Rubino in 1894.

The would-be assassin in 1894.

The King, who was returning from a service to honour his wife Marie Henriette, who had died two months earlier, was not hit by any of the three bullets Rubino fired. However, Grand Marshall, Count Charles John d’Oultremont was nearly killed.

Rubino, who had fled Italy to avoid a lengthy prison sentence there, died in prison in 1918. Prior to the failed assassination, he had been working in Britain as a spy on Italian anarchists – a position he lost when it was discovered he sympathised with them.

At the time of the attempt on his life, the King – in his late sixties – had been estranged from his wife for some time, and had taken a teenage girl as his mistress. He died in December, 1909.

On this day: British troops near Ypres

The Battle of Passchendaele. British troops photographed 9th August, 1917. Belgium. First World War. By John Warwick Brooke.

This photograph by John Warwick Brooke, dated the 9th of August, 1917, shows British troops involved in the Battle of Passchendaele (also known as the Third Battle of Ypres) in Belgium. The battle lasted for over three months, from the end of July to November.

Note the camouflage materials on the back of one of the wagons.

100 years ago today: Edith Cavell returns home

Nurse Cavell at Westminster Abbey - After the Armistice her body was brought in state at Westminster Abbey, 15th May 1919.

From the collection of the Imperial War Museums

The body of British nurse Edith Cavell is depicted here being taken to Westminster Abbey in London for a state funeral on the 15th of May, 1919. The image was created by English artist Henry Rushbury.

Cavell, who had helped Allied soldiers escape German-occupied Belgium during the First World War, was arrested by German authorities and executed by firing squad on the 12th of October, 1915.

Cavell’s killing sparked international outrage, and the incident was used in war propaganda in the years following her death.

100 Years Ago in Belgium

The_Capture_of_Ostend,_October_1918_Q19247Damage to buildings in Gare Maritime, Ostend, blown up by the Germans before the evacuation of 17th October 1918. First world war. World War One

The coastal city of Ostend in Belgium – along with much of the rest of the country – was occupied by the Germans during the First World War. As the war began drawing to an end in October of 1918, the Germans destroyed buildings as they retreated on the 17th of October.

On this day: Celebrations in Brussels

Crossing the Seine and the advance to the Siegfried Line 24 August - December 1944 The inhabitants of Brussels greet British and Belgian troops after the liberation of the city. 4th Sept

Source

4th September 1944: The residents of Brussels, Belgium cheer for Belgian and British troops as they enter the city. Brussels was liberated the day before, after more than four years of Nazi occupation.

On this day: the Battle of Passchendaele

The_Battle_of_Passchendaele,_July-november_1917_Battle of Pilckem Ridge. German prisoners and British wounded crossing a duck board bridge over the Yser Canal. Near Boesinghe, 31 July 19

The Battle of Passchendaele, also known as the Third Battle of Ypres, was fought between the Allies and the German Empire in the First World War.

Part of the larger Battle of Pilckem Ridge, Passchendaele began on the 31st of July, 1917.

This photograph, taken on that first day, shows German prisoners and British wounded crossing a canal near Boesinghe (Boezinge) in Belgium.

On this day: Australians at War

In a photograph dated the 29th of October, 1917, Australian soldiers are seen on the move in Belgium during the Battle of Passchendaele (also known as the Third Battle of Ypres).

Australia fought alongside Britain and troops from other parts of the British Empire, France and Belgium against the German Empire in a battle that lasted from the end of July until mid-November.

The image’s original information reads as follows:

Soldiers of an Australian 4th Division field artillery brigade on a duckboard track passing through Chateau Wood, near Hooge in the Ypres salient, 29 October 1917. The leading soldier is Gunner James Fulton and the second soldier is Lieutenant Anthony Devine. The men belong to a battery of the 10th Field Artillery Brigade.

From the collection of the Australian War Memorial, Canberra.

Soldiers of an Australian 4th Division field artillery brigade on a duckboard track passing through Chateau Wood, near Hooge in the Ypres salient, 29 October 1917

100 Years Ago

This photo was taken #OnThisDay 1917 during the Broodseinde and Passchendaele operations #myawm #history The entrance to the General Staff Office at the Headquarters of the 3rd Australia

From the collection of the Australian War Memorial, Canberra.

Soldiers of the 3rd Australian Division at the entrance to the General Staff Office on the 21st of October, 1917. This was during fighting at Ypres, Belgium in the First World War.

On this day: British troops in 1916

The British Army on the Western Front, 1914-1918: Gunners of the Royal Garrison Artillery outside a bomb-proof dug-out at Reninghelst (Reningelst), Belgium. 15th June 1916.

The_British_Army_on_the_Western_Front,_1914-1918_Q698 The British Army on the Western Front, 1914-1918 Gunners of the Royal Garrison Artillery outside a bomb-proof dug-out at Reninghelst

On this day: the plane crash that killed an entire sporting team

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Found in the wreckage X

On the 15th of February, 1961 the plane transporting the entire US figure skating team to the World Championships crashed in Belgium, killing everyone on board.

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Two days earlier, national ladies’ champion Laurence Owen, aged sixteen, had been featured on the cover of Sports Illustrated. There is a common myth that appearing on the cover of the magazine curses athletes, as she is not the only person to have something terrible happen soon afterwards.

 owens-girlslaurence-and-maribel-owen-with-their-legendary-mother-coach-maribel

The Owen family. X

Owen’s sister Maribel, also a member of the team, and her mother, a coach and former champion herself, were also on the flight.

In addition to the seventy-two people on the plane, a farmer was also killed by flying debris.

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The team boards the plane the day before the crash. X

Once news of the crash got out, the Championships, scheduled to be held in Prague, were cancelled to honour the victims.