On this day: a Royal Visit in Canada

King Edward VII came to power in January of 1901, upon the death of his mother, Queen Victoria. The King’s son and heir and his wife, the Duke of York and the Duchess of Cornwall, subsequently went on a world tour of British territories.

They are photographed here in Ottawa, Canada’s capital city, attending a lacrosse tournament on the 21st September.

Ottawa Canada Duke's visit, 21st September, 1901. Royal party at Lacrosse match. 1901 royal tour of Canada by Duke and Duchess of Cornwall and York. Edwardian era.

That day the Duke also presented medals:

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Victorian Belfast

Today in Belfast: the gorgeous Victorian Catholic church of St Malachy, which was very nearly destroyed by the Nazis in World War Two.

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On this day: the British Empire declares war

Enlisting for World War I. Recruiting Officer (beside flag ) with volunteers and their relatives and friends. Babe Cooper (second from the left of recruiting officer.) Jerseyville, NSW A

The British Empire entered the First World War on the 4th of August, 1914, with a declaration of war on the German Empire.

This declaration drew Britain’s territories overseas into the conflict, including Australia.

This image is of a military recruitment station in the Australian village of Jerseyville, New South Wales. The Recruitment Officer (beside the flag), new recruits, and their families pose for a photograph, circa 1914.

On this day: a school in Ireland

The Carrickfergus Model School in County Antrim, Ireland (now Northern Ireland) is seen here on the 19th of July, 1907. The school opened in the Victorian era, and is still running today.

Source

Carrickfergus_Model_School,_County_Antrim_(9835994746) Photograph of Carrickfergus Model School, County Antrim. Northern Ireland. 19th Jul7 1907.

On this day: free bread to honour the Queen

Canada honoured the Queen’s official birthday on the 21st of May this year. The British monarchs have celebrated an official birthday separate to their real birthday since the 1740s.

In 1859 this holiday occurred on the 24th of May, which was in fact Queen Victoria’s real birthday. To mark the occasion officials in Toronto handed out tickets for free loaves of bread.

1859-queens-birthday-vs As part of the celebrations surrounding Queen Victoria's birthday, the City of Toronto distributed free loaves of bread by way of tickets such as this one. Good f

On this day: Australian sport’s first international tour

Aboriginal_cricket_team_Tom_Wills_1866 Photograph of the first Aboriginal cricket team with coach and captain Tom Wills outside the MCC pavilion of the Melbourne Cricket Ground. December

The team photographed in December of 1866.

The first Australian sporting team to ever tour internationally was a cricket team from the colony of Victoria.

Tom_Wills_1857The team was made up of Aboriginal stockmen (people who work with livestock on Australian farms), and overseen by Tom Wills from the British colony of New South Wales. Cric

Tom Wills in 1857

The team was made up of Aboriginal stockmen (people who work with livestock on Australian farms), and overseen by Tom Wills from the British colony of New South Wales.

The team toured England between May and October in 1868. This newspaper article is from the 16th of May edition of The Sporting Life.

Sporting_Life,_London__16May1868The Sporting Life, London. 16 May 1868. The arrival of the Australian Aboriginal cricket team in England.

On this day: the death of a soldier

Light_horse_walersAustralian Imperial Force prior to their departure from Australia in November 1914. right is Trooper William Harry Rankin Woods, 1st Light Horse Regiment, who died of w

Trooper William Harry Rankin

From the collection of the Australian War Memorial, Canberra.

The Australian Imperial Force, the Australian Army’s expeditionary force in the First World War, was formed in August of 1914. The mounted Australian Light Horse made up part of this force.

This photograph was taken in November, 1914. The troops – both lighthorsemen – would soon leave Australia to fight.

Trooper William Harry Rankin is pictured on the right. He would go on to fight at Gallipoli in the Ottoman Empire, where he was killed on the 15th of May, 1915.

Rankin, from the New South Wales town of Mudgee, was thirty-nine at the time of his death.