Christmas in Canada

This photograph was taken on Christmas Day, 1901 in Ontario, Canada. People play ice hockey on the Rideau Canal in the capital city, Ottawa. The original image is slightly darker.

Source

Ice_hockey_1901 Hockey on the [Rideau] Canal [Christmas Day 1901]. 25 December 1901 Ottawa, Ontario. Canada. Winter Black and White

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On this day: celebrating the end of the war

On the 2nd of September, 1945, the Chinese community of Montreal, Canada held a parade to celebrate the surrender of the Japanese in the Second World War.

The parade took place in Chinatown, and was photographed by photojournalism pioneer Conrad Poirier.

Parade_in_Montreal's_Chinatown Montreal's Chinese community celebrates V-J Day and the official surrender of Japan with a parade in Chinatown. 2nd September 1945.

On this day: the St-Hilaire train disaster

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On the 29th of June, 1864, a train in Quebec, Canada fell through an open swing bridge and into the Richelieu River.

The worst train disaster in Canadian history, it is thought ninety-nine people died in the crash. The majority of people on board were European immigrants.

The investigation placed the blame for the disaster on Grand Trunk Railway, as the train failed to acknowledge stop signals that would have prevented it from falling through the bridge.

On this day: the Great Fire of Saint John

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The Great Fire of Saint John occurred in New Brunswick, Canada on the 20th of June, 1877.

It was after two in the afternoon when a spark fell onto hay in a storehouse, sparking a fire that burnt for nine hours. At least nineteen people were killed and many more were injured.

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1612 structures were destroyed, including fourteen hotels, eight churches, six banks, and a number of boats. The heat of the flames was so great that some buildings were said to have burst into flames before the fire reached them.

Cities all over the world donated money to the rebuilding effort, including Chicago, a city that had suffered a massive fire less than six years before.