On this day: Coventry in Ruins

The English city of Coventry suffered numerous Nazi bombing attacks in the blitz of 1940, but the worst came in November.

The city was bombarded from the 14th to the 15th, killing hundreds of people and injuring many hundreds more.

Coventry_devastation_H_5601A street in Coventry, England, after the Coventry Blitz of 14–15 November 1940. In the background are the tower and spire of Holy Trinity parish church. 16th

Coventry_bomb_damage_H5600Broadgate in Coventry city centre following the Coventry Blitz of 14-15 November 1940. The burnt out shell of the Owen Owen department store (opened in 1937) 16

These photographs were taken on the 16th, showing many buildings ruined, and the recently built Owen Owen department store – the exterior still stands, but the inside was destroyed.

Coventry_Cathedral_after_the_air_raid_in_1940The ruined nave and chancel of Coventry Cathedral, England, seen from the west tower. It is in ruins after the German air raid of November 19

Coventry Cathedral was largely ruined, and still stands as a shell today. The new cathedral was built next door, and opened in 1962.

Hundreds more people were killed in German bombings the following year.

On this day: the Coventry Blitz

A wrecked bus is photographed amongst the destruction in Coventry, England after a German Luftwaffe air raid on the night of 14-15 November, 1940.

Coventry suffered heavy damage in the Second World War. The city’s famous cathedral was one of the casualties of the “Coventry Blitz”, which killed many hundreds and left thousands without homes.

From the collection of the Imperial War Museum.

A wrecked bus stands among a scene of devastation in the centre of Coventry after the major Luftwaffe air raid on the night of 14-15 November 1940. Second World War Two England United Ki

On this day: a Manor House in England

Brooke_RemainsCheylesmore_HAGAM_tifThe manor house of Cheylesmore, England in a watercolour and ink painting by William Henry Brooke. dated the 25th of December, 1820.

The manor house of Cheylesmore, England in a watercolour and ink painting by William Henry Brooke, dated the 25th of December, 1820. Parts of the building date back to the year 1250, and some of its most famous residents were Edward, the Black Prince and Henry VI.

Unfortunately, much of what did survive the Second World War was demolished in a development project in the 1950s.

Cheylesmore now makes up part of the southern half of the city of Coventry in the West Midlands.