On this day: Australian troops in France

Troops of the Australian 7th Brigade (Australian 2nd Division) pass the former German bunker known as “Gibraltar” in Pozières, France on the 28th of August, 1916.

The Battle of Pozières was part of the larger Battle of the Somme, which claimed around a million casualties. Pozières marked a victory against the German Empire for Australia, with the help of British troops. First World War.

From the collection of the Australian War Memorial, Canberra.

Gibraltar_bunker_Pozieres_(AWM_EZ0098)Australian 7th Brigade (Australian 2nd Division) pass former German bunker known as Gibraltar western end of Pozières 28 August 1916 during the Bat

Advertisements

On this day: Australian soldiers in France

10th August 1916: Australian infantry soldiers march towards their rest billet after fighting in the Battle of Pozières – part of the much larger First World War Battle of the Somme in France.

The Battle of Pozières, where Empire forces from Britain and Australia fought the Germans, resulted in a British victory.

The Brigade suffered 1898 casualties in the fighting between 25th of July and the 7th of August. Australian war historian Charles Bean wrote that Pozières ridge “is more densely sown with Australian sacrifice than any other place on earth”.

From the collection of the Australian War Memorial, Canberra.

Australian_6th_Brigade_marching_Somme_(AWM_EZ0092)10th August 1916 First World War One Near Warloy Somme Australian Infantry marching to their rest billets after fighting at Battle of Po

On this day: Images from the Battle of the Somme

The Battle of the Somme, one of the bloodiest battles in recorded history, was fought between July and November, 1916 as part of the First World War. The armies of Britain, France, and their empires fought the German Empire.

These images by famed British war photographer Ernest Brooks are dated the 10th of August.

King George V inspecting a German dug-out near Fricourt, 10th August 1916.

X

The_Battle_of_the_Somme,_July-november_1916_Q970King George V inspecting a German dug-out near Fricourt, 10th August 1916.

Captured 15 cm (150 mm) Ringkanone 92 German gun near Mametz Wood, 10th August 1916.

X

The_Battle_of_the_Somme,_July-november_1916_Q1044

German observation post in Trones Wood.

X

The_Battle_of_the_Somme,_July-november_1916_Q862German observation post in Trones Wood, 10th August 1916. The Battle of the Somme. Ernest Brooks.

The Royal cars passing through a village on the journey from Chateau Bryas to Franvillers, passing a battalion of the Worcestershire Regiment on the march.

X

The_Battle_of_the_Somme,_July-november_1916_Q952The Royal cars pass through a village from Chateau Bryas to Franvillers, passing a battalion of the Worcestershire Regiment on the march,

On this day: British troops near Ypres

The Battle of Passchendaele. British troops photographed 9th August, 1917. Belgium. First World War. By John Warwick Brooke.

This photograph by John Warwick Brooke, dated the 9th of August, 1917, shows British troops involved in the Battle of Passchendaele (also known as the Third Battle of Ypres) in Belgium. The battle lasted for over three months, from the end of July to November.

Note the camouflage materials on the back of one of the wagons.

P. L. Travers’ 120th Birthday

australian p. l. travers in the role of titania in a production of a midsummer night's dream, c. 1924 state library of new south wales. mary poppins

P. L. Travers in the role of Titania in A Midsummer Night’s Dream, circa 1924.

State Library of New South Wales

Today would have been the 120th birthday of the Australian creator of Mary Poppins, P. L. Travers.

Born Helen Lyndon Goff in Maryborough, Queensland on the 9th of August 1899, she moved to Bowral, New South Wales in 1907.

As an adult she travelled Australia and New Zealand, and later England as an actress, changing her name to Pamela Lyndon Travers.

Travers created Mary Poppins while renting a cottage in Sussex, England in 1933, and the first book was published in 1934.

The eighth and final book in the series was published in 1988.

Travers died, aged ninety-six, in April of 1996.

Travers died, aged ninety-six, in April of 1996.

On this day: the Coronation of King Edward VII and Queen Alexandra

Edward_VIIs_coronation_procession_London_9_August_1902Procession passing along a busy London thoroughfare during the Coronation of King Edward VII and Queen Alexandra (1841-1910) on 9 Au

The Procession in State through London’s streets.

The coronation of Britain’s King Edward VII and Queen Alexandra took place on the 9th of August, 1902, more than a year and a half after the death of Queen Victoria, Edward’s mother and predecessor.

The coronation, initially set for the 26th of June, was postponed because of the King’s ill health. This caused significant problems for many people. Numerous functions had been planned for the day, and foreign dignitaries were in London to celebrate. Additionally, rooms on the parade route across London had been rented for high prices, which resulted in landmark court cases when the customers missed out.

From his sickbed Edward insisted that the “Coronation Dinner for the Poor of London” go ahead as planned, and 500 000 meals were served.

The Procession in State – pictured above on revised August date – was supposed to include military units from a number of European countries, but they all had to return home before the coronation finally took place.

A second procession following the one on the day of the coronation was also postponed until the end of October, again because the King was in poor health.

Edward, overweight and a heavy smoker, died less than eight years after his coronation.

Alexandra lived another fifteen and a half years after her husband’s death.

 

 

On this day: A King’s Coronation

City_of_London_(14929011094)Sir Marcus Samuel, Lord Mayor of London makes his way to Westminster Abbey from Guildhall for the Coronation of Edward VII on Saturday 9th August 1902.

The Coronation of Edward VII took place in London on Saturday the 9th of August, 1902, more than a year and a half after the death of the King’s mother and predecessor, Queen Victoria. The event had been postponed due to the King’s ill health.

In this photograph Sir Marcus Samuel, Lord Mayor of London, travels to Westminster Abbey from Guildhall for the event.

He travels in the Lord Mayor’s State Coach, which was built in Holborn in 1757.

The new King reigned until his death in May, 1910.