On this day: a school in Ireland

The Carrickfergus Model School in County Antrim, Ireland (now Northern Ireland) is seen here on the 19th of July, 1907. The school opened in the Victorian era, and is still running today.

Source

Carrickfergus_Model_School,_County_Antrim_(9835994746) Photograph of Carrickfergus Model School, County Antrim. Northern Ireland. 19th Jul7 1907.

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On this day: British troops prepare for battle

This photograph, dated the 17th of July, 1916 show British troops digging themselves in on the last day of the Battle of Bazentin Ridge.

Part of the larger Battle of the Somme, Bazentin Ridge – in France – began on the 14th and resulted in a British victory over the German Empire.

The_Battle_of_the_Somme,_July-november_1916_Q3980 Battle of Bazentin Ridge. British troops digging themselves in by using entrenching tools, Mametz Wood, 17th July 1916.

On this day: British troops in France

British air mechanics work on wrecked fuselages on the 12th of July, 1918, as the First World War neared its end. The image was taken at the aircraft repair depot near Rang-du-Fliers in the north of France.

From the collection of the Imperial War Museums.

The_Royal_Flying_Corps_on_the_Western_Front,_1914-1918_Q12073 British air mechanics working on wrecked fuselages at the aircraft repair depot near Rang du Fliers, 12th July 1918.

On this day: an anniversary of women at war

7th July 1918: British members of the Women’s Army Auxiliary Corps work on a car in Étaples, France.

Exactly one year earlier the WAAC was formed as the women’s unit of the British Army. In the final sixteen months of the First World War some 57 000 women served.

THE WOMEN'S ARMY AUXILIARY CORPS ON THE WESTERN FRONT, 1917-1918. Fitters of the WAAC at work on a car at Etaples, 7 July 1918.

100 Years Ago: Britain’s Deadliest Explosion

Women_at_work_during_the_First_World_War-_Munitions_Production,_Chilwell,_Nottinghamshire,_England,_UK,_c_1917_Q30011A Around 21 August, 1917

The factory in August of 1917.

On the 1st of July, 1918, the deadliest explosion in British history occurred near Chilwell in Nottinghamshire, England.

The disaster happened at National Filling Factory No. 6, a First World War munitions factory that had been in operation since 1915. The factory was known for its “Canary girls“: women shell makers.

Female munitions workers guide 6 inch howitzer shells being lowered to the floor at the Chilwell ammunition factory in Nottinghamshire, UK. July 1917.

“Canary Girls”

On the day of the disaster eight tons of TNT blew up, killing 134 people and injuring 250 others, however newspapers at the time reported a much lower death toll.

The site of the factory is now home to Chetwynd Barracks.

Waiting for Battle

A British sentry is photographed here in the lead-up to the Battle of the Somme. Seen on the 28th of June, 1916 – three days before the months-long battle began – he watches from outside Café Jordan, Mailly Maillet, France.

The photographer was Ernest Brooks, a Englishman most famous for his work in the First World War.

The_Battle_of_the_Somme,_July-november_1916_Q720 A British mounted sentry outside Cafe Jordan, Mailly Maillet, 28th June 1916. The Battle of the SOmme.

On this day: Preparations for Battle

This image is of the British Army preparing mortar ammunition in Acheux, France for the infamous Battle of the Somme in the First World War. The image is dated the 28th of June, 1916, while the battle began on the 1st of July, resulting in over a million casualties (about one third of the soldiers who fought).

The battle concluded on the 18th of November.

The_Battle_of_the_Somme,_July-november_1916_Q749 The Battle of the Somme Trench mortar ammunition behind the lines. Acheux, 28th June 1916.