New York’s Easter Parade

Between 1910 and 1915

New York City has hosted an Easter parade on Fifth Avenue since the 19th century. Taking place on Easter Sunday, for decades it was one of the most significant cultural events of the year.

Here are some images of the parade from the late 19th and early 20th centuries:

1898

Fifth_Avenue_Easter_Parade,_1898 Fifth Avenue and the Easter Parade, New York 1898.

1899

Easter_parade_Fifth_Avenue_1899. Easter Parade on Fifth Avenue, New York 1899.

1900

EasterParade1900 Fifth Avenue in New York City on Easter Sunday in 1900

1905

Easter_Parade_1905Easter Parade on Fifth Avenue, New York 1905

1912

Easter_Parade_1912 Easter Parade on Fifth Avenue, New York 1912.

1914

Easter_parade_1914 Easter Parade, New York 1914.

Easter in Ukraine

This 1887 painting of Ukrainian Easter is by Mykola Pymonenko.

Easter in Ukraine is a very significant holiday, with celebrations stretching long before and after the traditional Easter weekend. Ukrainians take baskets to church to be blessed, loaded with traditional foods and decorated with embroidery, candles, and the world-famous pysanky, the hand-painted eggs.

ПимоненкоСтрастныйчетвергUkrainian Easter by Mykola Pymonenko 1887

Wartime Ukrainian Easter

Before, during, and after the Second World War, Ukrainians resisted (often in underground organisations), occupation by both Russia and Germany, as well as military aggression from others including Hungary and Romania. Additionally, the west of Ukraine was under Polish rule before the Soviets invaded. The region suffered heavily during Operation Barbarossa.

These vintage Ukrainian Easter cards are from that turbulent time – note the rifle carried by the man on the horse.

The writing is the typical Easter message for Ukraine, and translates to ‘Christ is Risen’.

American professor Timothy Snyder is a good place to start for information on the most overlooked aspect of the war, particularly his book Bloodlands: Europe Between Hitler and Stalin.

Easter_card_Ukr_Legion These Easter cards are Ukrainian, and represent the era and the underground forces fighting more than one invader at the same time

Easter_card_ukr_leg These Easter cards are Ukrainian, and represent the era and the underground forces fighting more than one invader at the same time

Victorian Hot Cross Buns

This image and the recipes for hot cross buns for Easter are from a book published in 1900, at the end of the Victorian era.

The_pride_of_the_household;_the_bakers'_complete_management_(1900)_(14793494933) Hot Cross Bun Recipe 1900

Text Appearing Before Image:

Copyright, 1900, by M. A. & K. M. Heinzer. TEA RUSK. 178 Tea Rusk. I pint of milk (lukewarm). 1 teaspoonful of salt. 2 tablespoonfiils of butter.2 table spoonfuls of lard. 4 tablespoonfuls of sugar.^ teaspoonful of cinnamon,^ ounce of compressed yeast.2 eggs.7 cups of flour. HOW TO MIX. Dissolve yeast in lukewarm milk and pour it into a wooden bowl, then add in the salt, lard, butter, eggs, sugar and cinnamon and mix lightly, then add in the flour and mix thoroughly. This dough will rise in 3 hours. When done, lap the dough over and let it stand one-half hourlonger, then place the dough on a table and break off small pieces the size of a walnut and roll them round and place them close together in a high bread pan, then let them rise45 minutes, and bake them in a moderate oven. Whenbaked, wash them over the top with molasses. These will bake in one-half hour. This will make 18 or 24 rusk. Copyright, 1900, by M. A. & K. M. Heinzer. i 1/9

Text Appearing After Image:

Copyright, 1900, by M. A. & K. M. Heinzer. HOT CROSS BUNS. 180 ^ teaspoonful of lemon extract. Hot Cross Buns. I quart of milk (lukewarm). I- ounce of compressed yeast. I teaspoonful of salt. I teaspoonful of cinnamon. •J teaspoonful of mace. i ■J pound of currants^ cup of butter.•J cup of lard.i6 cups of flour,f cup of sugar.6 eggs. HOW TO MIX. Dissolve yeast in lukewarm milk and pour it into a wooden bowl, then add in the salt, butter, eggs, sugar, lard, spices and extract and mix lightly, then add in the flour and mix thoroughly, add in the currants and mix i minute. This will rise in 4 hours. When done, lap the dough over and let it stand 45 minutes longer, then place it on a table and break off pieces the size of a small Qgg, then roll them round and place them on a greased pan and let them stand20 minutes, then cut them with a hot cross bun cutter, or a pair of scissors, and let them stand 10 or 15 minutes longer. Bake in the same heat as for baking bread.