On this day: the murder of Hulda Stumpf

Hulda_Stumpf

American missionary Hulda Stumpf was murdered in Kijabe, Kenya on the 3rd of January, 1930.

Stumpf, who had spoken out in opposition of Female Genital Mutilation, a widespread and often life-threatening tradition performed across Africa to this day, and practiced in the region of Kenya where she lived, was found dead in her home on the morning of Friday the 3rd. She had been brutally beaten, and then strangled.

Hulda_Stumpf,_Africa_Inland_Mission_conference 1917

Stumpf sits on the bottom left of this 1917 photograph

In the end, no strong conclusions could be drawn about her death.

 

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When Australian women were accidentally given the vote.

Australian Suffragettes

Australian suffragettes in London in 1911

In the nineteenth century, in the colony of Victoria in Australia, the Electoral Act 1863 was passed. According to the act, “all persons” who owned property were entitled to vote. Though it was not intended to include women in this, there were plenty in the state who did, indeed own property.

In the 1864 elections, some women took advantage of this error and went to the polling stations, where their votes were recorded:

The Argus  , 5 November 1864, p 4. When women in Australia accidentally got the vote.

“At one of the polling booths in the Castlemaine district a novel sight was witnessed. A coach filled with ladies drove up, and the fair occupants alighted and recorded their votes.”
The Argus , 5 November 1864, p 4.

The oversight was quickly fixed, and a new law in 1865 once again took voting rights away from women. However, Australia was very early in granting women full voting rights, in 1902.

 

 

On this day: a suffragette march in New York

Some 20 000 women marched in New York City on the 23rd of October, 1915. In the lead up to an election, women demanded the right to vote.

It was another five years before women nation-wide in the United States received that right.

Source

Pre-election_suffrage_parade_NYCPre-election suffrage parade, New York City, October 23, 1915. 20,000 women marched.

The twentieth anniversary of the Atlanta Olympics bombing.

Flags fly at half-mast at the 1996 Atlanta Olympics after two were killed and 111 injured in a bombing for an anti-abortion and anti-gay agenda.

Olympic Park in Atlanta, Georgia, USA was bombed on the 27th of July, 1996. Two people were killed and 111 injured when Eric Robert Rudolph placed a US military pack containing three pipe bombs surrounded by nails in the so-called “town square” of the Olympic venue.

He later said he committed the attack because he didn’t agree with women having the right to abortion.

Atlanta_Olympic_Park_Bomb_AftermathFlags fly at half-mast at the 1996 Atlanta Olympics after two were killed and 111 injured in a bombing for an anti-abortion and anti-gay agenda.

Rudolph later confessed to the bombings of women’s health clinics and gay bars.

On this day: the death of Kate Sheppard

Kate Sheppard, photographed in 1905.

In 1905

Kate Sheppard, New Zealand’s most famous suffragette, died on the 13th of July, 1934.

Born to Scottish parents in England in 1847, Sheppard moved to New Zealand in 1869.

She became a significant figure both in gaining women the vote, and then in getting women to the polls for the first time in 1893.

NZ_Dollar_TenNew Zealand ten-dollar note Kate Sheppard

New Zealand was a leading nation in women’s suffrage, and Sheppard’s efforts gained her a place on the country’s $10 note.

On this day: Emily Davison’s collision with a racehorse

On the 4th of June, 1913 militant suffragette Emily Davison rushed onto the racetrack at the Epsom Derby, running in front of a racehorse. She was trampled by the horse and died four days later.

It is unknown exactly what her motives were, but as she had clear plans for the rest of the day and for the days immediately afterwards, it seems she had not planned to become a martyr for her cause.

Emily_davison_killed_1913Emily Davison is struck by King George's horse, Anmer, and knocked unconscious. She died four days later. 4th June 1913.

The horse’s jockey got his foot caught in the stirrup and was dragged along, unconscious, but survived.

On this day: Spinsters Are Wonderful People

On the 10th of May, 1958, the Australian Catholic Truth Society released a pamphlet titled: Spinsters Are Wonderful People: In Praise of Unmarried Women.

Spinsters Are Wonderful People In Praise of Unmarried Women. The Australian Catholic Truth Society. 10th May 1958 Daniel A. Lord, S.J..

It seems this pamphlet may have been produced a number of times, as a version dated 1950 can be read HERE.

An excerpt:

THE CHURCH MAKES A CHANGE

Whatever literature may say about spinsters, and however much history may ignore them – except for outstanding spinsters like Elizabeth of England – the Church’s attitude toward unmarried women has been, from the first, one of reverence. This I came to know when my faith emerged from mere youthful practice to intelligent study and appreciation. Among the Jews a spinster was merely an unfortunate girl not lucky enough to have won a husband for herself. Among the pagans she was usually the slave or bondmaiden, the grudgingly tolerated hanger-on in the house of her parents or her luckier married sisters.

With St. Paul all that was changed. He loved virginity, and he turned to the ministrations and loyalty – as many a parish has done since – of the splendid young and older unmarried women of his time. The legends of St. Paul and St. Tecla – whose name was the Greek word for pearl – are many and beautiful. Phoebe, to whom Paul sends affectionate messages, seems to have been one of the first consecrated Catholic virgins.