On this day: Preparing for Battle

This photograph, dated the 24th of June, 1918, shows Italian troops at 10am, waiting for battle.

They are in the commune of Nervesa, in the northern Italian Veneto region, an area that was largely destroyed in battle in the days immediately before.

The soldiers retook the region from the Austro-Hungarians.

World War 1 - Italian Army Nervesa - Italian troops at 10am on 24th June 1918 near the train station before the battle

On this day: the death of a war hero

Only hours after being awarded the French Légion d_honneur, British Lieutenant Reginald Warneford was killed in an aeroplane crash on the 17th of June, 1915.

Only hours after being awarded the French Légion d’honneur, British Lieutenant Reginald Warneford was killed in an aeroplane crash on the 17th of June, 1915.

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A 1919 painting depicting the moment the Zeppelin was brought down.

Only twenty-three at the time of his accident, Warneford, a member of the Royal Naval Air Service had been hailed a hero ten days earlier when he’d brought down a German Zeppelin in the First World War.

After the presentation ceremony and reception Warneford was transporting American journalist Henry Beach Newman from an aerodrome at Buc when the plane crashed, killing both passengers. Newman died instantly, while Warneford died of his injuries shortly afterwards.

The funeral took place in July. X

In addition to his French award, he was also given the Victoria Cross.

On this day: British troops in 1916

The British Army on the Western Front, 1914-1918: Gunners of the Royal Garrison Artillery outside a bomb-proof dug-out at Reninghelst (Reningelst), Belgium. 15th June 1916.

The_British_Army_on_the_Western_Front,_1914-1918_Q698 The British Army on the Western Front, 1914-1918 Gunners of the Royal Garrison Artillery outside a bomb-proof dug-out at Reninghelst

On this day: a Zeppelin falls

This 1919 image captures the moment British Lieutenant Reginald Warneford famously brought down a German Zeppelin on the 7th of June, 1915.

Warneford, a member of the Royal Naval Air Service in the First World War, was awarded the French Légion d’honneur ten days later – and died in an aeroplane crash that afternoon.

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On this day: the aftermath of a battle

This image from inside the British HMS Castor was taken in June, 1916. It shows damage after shelling during the two-day Battle of Jutland that ended on the 1st of June. The crew of this battleship suffered ten casualties fighting the Germans.

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HMS_Castor_damage A photograph taken from inside the hull of the light cruiser HMS Castor after the Battle of Jutland showing a large shell hole. Her crew suffered ten casualties during

On this day: the first wounded in the Battle of Jutland

HMS_Castor__Wounded_Received_After_the_Battle_of_Jutland,_31st_May_1916_Art_IWMART2781 HMS Castor. Wounded Received After the Battle of Jutland, 31st May 1916.

HMS Castor. Wounded Received After the Battle of Jutland, 31st May 1916. X

Fought in between the British Royal Navy‘s Grand Fleet and the Imperial German Navy‘s High Seas Fleet, the Battle of Jutland took place from the 31st of May to the 1st of June, 1916.

Part of the First World War, it was one of the last battles fought solely between ships in the history of the world.

HMS Castor was one of the Cambrian subclass of the C-class of light cruisers. She saw service during the First World War and the Russian Civil War.

The HMS Castor – the British ship in the painting – can be seen above.

On this day: the death of Winnipeg the bear

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Winnie in 1914 X

Winnipeg (or Winnie), a female black bear from Canada and the inspiration for Winnie-the-Pooh, died in London Zoo on the 12th of May, 1934. She was twenty at the time.

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Winnie and Harry Colebourn X

Winnie was purchased as an orphaned cub at a train stop in Ontario in 1914. She was bought for $20 by Harry Colebourn, a twenty-seven year old veterinarian who had volunteered for World War One and was on his way to report for duty. He named her after his hometown of Winnipeg, Manitoba.

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Winnie plays with Canadian soldiers during WW1.

Winnie, who became a military mascot, was kept in London for the years Colebourn served in the war, and he eventually donated her to the zoo.

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Winnie-the-Pooh makes a debut on Christmas Eve, 1925. X

The inspiration for Winnie-the-Pooh came after creator A. A. Milne’s son Christopher Robin visited the bear at the zoo and changed the name of his toy bear from “Edward Bear” to “Winnie the Pooh”.