On this day: a parade in London

The partially built County Hall is in the background.

Victory march of the Allied troops in London. July 19th, 1919.

Victory march of the Allied troops in London. July 19th, 1919. The procession crossing Westminster Bridge. Saturday 19th July 1919 and contingents of Military units are taking part in th

On this day: Peace Day in Britain

Soon after the end of the First World War, the 19th of July was designated as Peace Day in Britain.

The image below was taken on that day in 1919, during celebrations outside the Guildhall in Winchester in Hampshire.

Peace_day_in_Winchester Photograph of a crowd of people celebrating the end of the First World War. 19th July 1919 was designated Peace Day and was marked in different ways across the co

The Canary Girls

The so-called “Canary girls” were British women who worked through the First World War to make trinitrotoluene (TNT) shells. The nickname was given to them as repeated exposure to the substances they used turned their skin the colour of a canary.

Hundreds of the women became ill from the conditions they worked in, with one hundred fatalities reported.

The image below is of women in Nottinghamshire in July, 1917.

Female munitions workers guide 6 inch howitzer shells being lowered to the floor at the Chilwell ammunition factory in Nottinghamshire, UK. July 1917.

On this day: a Peace Treaty is Signed

The Treaty of Versailles, the most important of the peace treaties to end the First World War, was signed in the Hall of Mirrors in the Palace of Versailles on the 28th of June, 1919.

The war also began on the 28th of June, when Serbian assassin Gavrilo Princip murdered Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria and his wife, Sophie five years before.

The Signing of Peace in the Hall of Mirrors, Versailles, 28th June 1919.

Painted by Irish artist William Orpen

The Signing of Peace in the Hall of Mirrors, Versailles, 28th June 1919.

On this day: a pet dog at war

This image of British soldiers playing with their dog in a trench near Gavrelle, France is dated the 27th of June, 1917.

Taking pets and native animal mascots to the trenches was quite common in the First World War, including kangaroos, and Winnie the black bear who inspired Winnie-the-Pooh.

The British Army on the Western Front, 1914-1918 Soldiers in an old trench near Gavrelle playing with their pet dog, 27th June 1917.