Ten Years

Today is the tenth anniversary of the Russian invasion of Georgia. Russia still occupies parts of the country, and landowners on the fake new borders report having more of their property stolen every day – it’s a slow motion invasion the world has completely forgotten about.

As with Russian-occupied parts of Ukraine, ethnic cleansing is taking place in occupied Georgia, and the Russians are destroying all evidence of local people’s culture and history. Historic buildings are being torn down. (A Crimean Tatar set himself on fire in protest the other day – on camera; nobody in the world reported it.)

Georgia was Putin’s test run for his invasion of Ukraine. Taking place just after Obama came to power, he learnt that world leaders wouldn’t act on Russian aggression.

Even though it’s not really needed for diplomatic purposes, Georgia maintains an embassy here in Canberra, to remind people in the South Pacific why they shouldn’t be doing trade with the Kremlin (Fiji and New Zealand, I’m looking at you!).

On this day: America’s most lopsided football game

On the 7th of October, 1916, a college football game was played between Cumberland and Georgia Tech in Atlanta, USA. Tech on the left. Score 0 - 222

The infamous game. Georgia Tech on the left. Source.

On the 7th of October, 1916, a college football game was played between Cumberland and Georgia Tech in Atlanta, USA.

GT_Cumberland_222_scoreboardScoreboard at the end of the 1916 Cumberland vs. Georgia Tech football game.

The final scoreboard.

Cumberland, from Tennessee, failed to score at all, leading the most lopsided score in the history of the sport: 0 – 222. The college had already discontinued its football program, but were not allowed to back out of the game.

Day of Remembrance

The 23rd of August is the European Day of Remembrance for Victims of Stalinism and Nazism.

The image below depicts Nazi Germany and Stalinist Russia attacking Ukraine, Lithuania, Belarus and Georgia.

August 23 - European Day of Remembrance for Victims of Stalinism and Nazism Ukraine Lithuania Belarus Georgia

The twentieth anniversary of the Atlanta Olympics bombing.

Flags fly at half-mast at the 1996 Atlanta Olympics after two were killed and 111 injured in a bombing for an anti-abortion and anti-gay agenda.

Olympic Park in Atlanta, Georgia, USA was bombed on the 27th of July, 1996. Two people were killed and 111 injured when Eric Robert Rudolph placed a US military pack containing three pipe bombs surrounded by nails in the so-called “town square” of the Olympic venue.

He later said he committed the attack because he didn’t agree with women having the right to abortion.

Atlanta_Olympic_Park_Bomb_AftermathFlags fly at half-mast at the 1996 Atlanta Olympics after two were killed and 111 injured in a bombing for an anti-abortion and anti-gay agenda.

Rudolph later confessed to the bombings of women’s health clinics and gay bars.

On this day: the Tiflis bank robbery

The information card on Joseph Stalin, from the files of the Tsarist secret police in St. Petersburg. Stalin's_Mug_Shot

Russian police file on Joseph Stalin

On the 26th of June, 1907, armed Bolsheviks stole a bank cash shipment in Tiflis (now Tbilisi, the capital of Georgia). Using bombs and guns, the attackers surrounded military and police in Yerevan (now Freedom) Square.

Amongst those involved in organising the robbery were future Soviet dictator Joseph Stalin, and Vladimir Lenin.

Forty people were killed and fifty others were injured in the attack.

Tbilisi in XIX century, Freedom Square. 19th century. Georgia.

Yerevan Square in the 19th century. X

The equivalent of millions of dollars were stolen, but in the end much of the money could not be used to fund Bolshevik activities, as the banknotes’ serial numbers were known to authorities.

On this day: Literature censorship in the United States

God’s Little Acre by Erskine Caldwell

On the 19th of February, 1953, the United States’ first literature censorship board was established in Georgia.

Misleadingly named the Georgia Literature Commission, the first publication targeted was God’s Little Acre by Erskine Caldwell.

Facing legal challenges from the outset, the board lasted about two decades and then was left to die out.