On this day: the Battle of Corunna

death-of-sir-john-moore-at-the-battle-of-corunna-derived-from-an-engraving-by-thomas-sutherland-and-aquatint-by-william-heath-16th-january-1809

The death of Sir John Moore X

Part of the Peninsula War (1807-14), the Battle of Corunna took place in Spain on the 16th of January, 1809.

Fought in Galicia, the battle was between the United Kingdom and France, and concluded with a British victory. However, the battle also paved the way for French occupation of other areas.

The British lost 900 men; the French lost between 600 and 700.

sir_john_moore_by_sir_thomas_lawrencelieutenant-general-sir-john-moore-kb-13-november-1761-16-january-1809-was-a-british-soldier-and-general-also-known-as-moore-of-corunna

Amongst the British dead was Sir John Moore, who was reassured of his victory before he died.

On this day…

The Russian invasion of Georgia: Russian tanks move along a street as children play with a toy truck in Tskhinvali on 30 August, 2008.

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Day of Remembrance

The 23rd of August is the European Day of Remembrance for Victims of Stalinism and Nazism.

The image below depicts Nazi Germany and Stalinist Russia attacking Ukraine, Lithuania, Belarus and Georgia.

August 23 - European Day of Remembrance for Victims of Stalinism and Nazism Ukraine Lithuania Belarus Georgia

On this day: the Tiflis bank robbery

The information card on Joseph Stalin, from the files of the Tsarist secret police in St. Petersburg. Stalin's_Mug_Shot

Russian police file on Joseph Stalin

On the 26th of June, 1907, armed Bolsheviks stole a bank cash shipment in Tiflis (now Tbilisi, the capital of Georgia). Using bombs and guns, the attackers surrounded military and police in Yerevan (now Freedom) Square.

Amongst those involved in organising the robbery were future Soviet dictator Joseph Stalin, and Vladimir Lenin.

Forty people were killed and fifty others were injured in the attack.

Tbilisi in XIX century, Freedom Square. 19th century. Georgia.

Yerevan Square in the 19th century. X

The equivalent of millions of dollars were stolen, but in the end much of the money could not be used to fund Bolshevik activities, as the banknotes’ serial numbers were known to authorities.