Bombed London Under Snow

January 1942: London stands in ruins and covered in snow after German bombing in the Second World War. A crane and truck can be seen clearing debris.

St Paul’s Cathedral – which survived the Blitz – is in the background.

From the collection of the Imperial War Museums.

bombed-london-in-the-snowThe destruction around St Paul's Cathedral air raid on London is softened by a heavy dusting of snow. mobile crane and truck can be seen work to clear up some of

On this day: the face of battle

A_British_infantry_sergeant_Second World War Two Black and White 1940s Vintage_BU1434The face of battle an infantry sergeant during the advance into Germany near Geilenkirchen, 5 Decembe

5th December 1944: Named by the Imperial War Museum the face of battle, this photograph is of a British infantry sergeant advancing into Geilenkirchen, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany – on the border with the Netherlands.

The month before, this was the site of Operation Clipper, which saw an Allied victory over the Nazis.

On this day: a War Child in London

On this day: a War Child in London

This now-famous photograph, taken by Cecil Beaton, appeared on the cover of American LIFE Magazine on the 23rd of September, 1943. It shows Eileen Dunne, aged “3 and 3/4” sitting in her hospital bed in London’s Great Ormond Street Hospital for Sick Children after being injured in a German air raid.

 

The LIFE cover.

The cover feature was significant, as it encouraged Americans – still more than a year out from joining the Second World War – to take more of an interest in the conflict.

The original caption for the photograph reads:

The wide-eyed young lady on the cover is Eileen Dunne, aged 3 3/4. A German bomber whose crew had never met her dropped a bomb on a North England village. A splinter from it hit Eileen. She is sitting in the hospital. A plucky chorus of wounded children had just finished singing in the North English dialect, “Roon, Rabbit, Roon.” The picture was taken by Cecil Beaton, the English photographer who generally specializes in fashionable or surrealist studies of society women.

80 Years Ago: the Outbreak of War

 

Civilians gather outside 10 Downing Street in London on the 1st of September, 1939, following the news of the German invasion of Poland and the beginning of the Second World War.

Britain declared war on Germany two days later, as did Australia and New Zealand (then both part of the British Empire).

July 1916: British soldiers on the Western Front

The_Battle_of_the_Somme,_July-november_1916_Q130Battle of Albert. Officers and men of the 10th Battalion, Notts. and Derby Regiment with wearing captured German helmets; the dog was foun

British soldiers pose for a photograph after the Battle of Albert, part of the opening phase of the infamous First World War Battle of the Somme, in July of 1916. The men wear helmets they captured from the Germans, and sit with a dog they found in a dugout.

From the collection of the Imperial War Museum.

On this day: the sinking of the Lusitania

British ocean liner RMS Lusitania was sunk by a German U-boat on the 7th of May, 1915, less than a year into the First World War. 1198 out of 1959 people aboard were killed, and the sinking played a big hand in turning international opinion against Germany.

This propaganda poster was released in Britain the same year, in an attempt to recruit men into the Leicestershire Regiment (now the Royal Leicestershire Regiment).

Leicestershire_Regiment_recruiting_poster_1915 Recruiting poster for the Leicestershire Regiment Men Of Leicestershire. Avenge The Lusitania. How To Do It Britain First World War One

On this day: Wounded soldiers in Norway.

Raid_on_Vaagso,_27_December_1941_N481 Norway British Army Second World War Two Black and White Vintage

27th December 1941: Wounded soldiers are transferred onto a landing craft in Vaagso (the island of Vågsøy), Norway. The country was under Nazi occupation at the time.

The photograph was taken during the one-day Operation Archery, a combined British and Norwegian raid against German forces that resulted in an Allied victory over the Nazis.

The Norwegian commander of the raid, Martin Linge, was killed in action during the operation.

A Prison Camp Christmas

Ruhleben_Prison_Camp_-_Christmas_Dinner_Art_IWMART528 1917 Frist world War One German Camp British Empire Prisoners

This painting depicts Christmas dinner in the Ruhleben internment camp in Germany in 1917. The camp, located west of Berlin, housed between 4000 and 5500 mainly British prisoners during the First World War.

The work was created by Anglo-Dutch artist Nico Jungmann, who was interned at Ruhleben because he was a naturalised British citizen.

From the collection of the Imperial War Museums.

On this day: British troops at war

The_Battle_of_Cambrai,_November-december_1917_Q6312Men of the Sherwood Foresters (Nottinghamshire & Derbyshire Regiment) salvaging German rifles near Marcoing, 22 November 1917. First Wo

Photograph by John Warwick Brooke

Men of the Sherwood Foresters (Nottinghamshire & Derbyshire Regiment) with German rifles salvaged near Marcoing on the 22nd of November, 1917. First World War.

The photograph was taken during the First Battle of Cambrai in France.

The Sherwood Foresters were an infantry regiment of the British Army from 1881 to 1970.