On this day: Queen Victoria in London

Her_Majesty_Greeting_her_People,_Diamond_Jubilee_Pageant,_London,_England Queen Victoria riding a coach through a crowd of onlookers during her Diamond Jubilee procession. 22nd June 1897

Link to enlarge the image.

This photograph was taken in London on the 22nd of June, 1897. Queen Victoria, then aged seventy-eight, takes part in a procession in honour of her Diamond Jubilee – sixty years on the British throne.

The Queen would die less than four years after this image was taken.

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On this day: the “Protein Man” in London

Englishman Stanley Green, a self-styled “dietary reform activist” whose mission was to decrease people’s libidos by changing their diets, photographed on Oxford Street in London on the 21st of June, 1974.

100 years ago today: Edith Cavell returns home

Nurse Cavell at Westminster Abbey - After the Armistice her body was brought in state at Westminster Abbey, 15th May 1919.

From the collection of the Imperial War Museums

The body of British nurse Edith Cavell is depicted here being taken to Westminster Abbey in London for a state funeral on the 15th of May, 1919. The image was created by English artist Henry Rushbury.

Cavell, who had helped Allied soldiers escape German-occupied Belgium during the First World War, was arrested by German authorities and executed by firing squad on the 12th of October, 1915.

Cavell’s killing sparked international outrage, and the incident was used in war propaganda in the years following her death.

On this day: Stanley Green was born

Protein Wisdom

On Oxford Street on the 21st of June, 1974.

Englishman Stanley Green, a self-styled “dietary reform activist” whose mission was to decrease people’s libidos by changing their diets, was born in Harringay, north London on the 22nd of February, 1915.

Stanley_Green,_Oxford_Street,_1977Englishman Stanley Green, a self-styled dietary reform activist whose mission was to decrease people's libidos by changing their diets, was born in Harr

In 1977

For twenty-five years, from 1968 until 1993, Green patrolled major shopping boulevard Oxford Street in London carrying placards and trying to convince people to take up a low-protein diet in order to both lose interest in sex and to become kinder.

Green died in December of 1993. He’d gained enough fame that obituaries for him were published in several major newspapers.

Celebrating the end of the Great War

These images were taken in London in early November of 1918, as the First World War drew to a close.

On the 5th of the month captured German field guns were put on display along the Mall, stretching from Admiralty Arch to Buckingham Palace.

On the 13th of November the guns were taken to Trafalgar Square, where people attempted to set them alight in a bonfire.

From the collection of the Imperial War Museums.

The_Mall_(13962686919)These images were taken in London in early November of 1918, as the First World War drew to a close. Captured German field guns were put on display along the Mall,

These images were taken in London in early November of 1918, as the First World War drew to a close. Captured German field guns were put on display along the Mall, stretching from Admira

These images were taken in London in early November of 1918, as the First World War drew to a close. Captured German field guns were put on display along the Mall, stretching from Admira

And a display on nearby Waterloo Place, St James’s.

These images were taken in London in early November of 1918, as the First World War drew to a close. Captured German field gun on Waterloo Place St James's.

On this day: a Rail Disaster in London

 

The scene looking south over the aftermath of the Harrow and Wealdstone train crash on 8 October 1952. The United Kingdom's worst peacetime rail disaster.

The United Kingdom’s worst peacetime rail disaster occurred at London’s Harrow and Wealdstone station on the 8th of October, 1952.

The scene looking south over the aftermath of the Harrow and Wealdstone train crash on 8 October 1952.Rescue workers around wrecked coaches after the Harrow and Wealdstone train crash on

112 people were killed when the City of Glasgow – an express train from Perth, Scotland – crashed into the back of a local passenger train at rush hour. The wreckage covered other rail lines, resulting in a third train – another express – to crash.

The scene looking south over the aftermath of the Harrow and Wealdstone train crash on 8 October 1952. The badly damaged locomotive of the Perth express train No. 46242 Coronation Class

The wrecked City of Glasgow.

In addition to over a hundred deaths, 340 other people were injured, with 88 transported to hospital for treatment.

The overturned second Liverpool locomotive No. 46202 and wrecked coaches after the Harrow and Wealdstone train crash on 8 October 1952.

An investigation found that the driver of the Perth train missed three signals before crashing, but as those involved were killed, the reason for this was never discovered.