Celebrating the end of the Great War

These images were taken in London in early November of 1918, as the First World War drew to a close.

On the 5th of the month captured German field guns were put on display along the Mall, stretching from Admiralty Arch to Buckingham Palace.

On the 13th of November the guns were taken to Trafalgar Square, where people attempted to set them alight in a bonfire.

From the collection of the Imperial War Museums.

The_Mall_(13962686919)These images were taken in London in early November of 1918, as the First World War drew to a close. Captured German field guns were put on display along the Mall,

These images were taken in London in early November of 1918, as the First World War drew to a close. Captured German field guns were put on display along the Mall, stretching from Admira

These images were taken in London in early November of 1918, as the First World War drew to a close. Captured German field guns were put on display along the Mall, stretching from Admira

And a display on nearby Waterloo Place, St James’s.

These images were taken in London in early November of 1918, as the First World War drew to a close. Captured German field gun on Waterloo Place St James's.

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On this day: a Rail Disaster in London

 

The scene looking south over the aftermath of the Harrow and Wealdstone train crash on 8 October 1952. The United Kingdom's worst peacetime rail disaster.

The United Kingdom’s worst peacetime rail disaster occurred at London’s Harrow and Wealdstone station on the 8th of October, 1952.

The scene looking south over the aftermath of the Harrow and Wealdstone train crash on 8 October 1952.Rescue workers around wrecked coaches after the Harrow and Wealdstone train crash on

112 people were killed when the City of Glasgow – an express train from Perth, Scotland – crashed into the back of a local passenger train at rush hour. The wreckage covered other rail lines, resulting in a third train – another express – to crash.

The scene looking south over the aftermath of the Harrow and Wealdstone train crash on 8 October 1952. The badly damaged locomotive of the Perth express train No. 46242 Coronation Class

The wrecked City of Glasgow.

In addition to over a hundred deaths, 340 other people were injured, with 88 transported to hospital for treatment.

The overturned second Liverpool locomotive No. 46202 and wrecked coaches after the Harrow and Wealdstone train crash on 8 October 1952.

An investigation found that the driver of the Perth train missed three signals before crashing, but as those involved were killed, the reason for this was never discovered.

On this day: Oxford Street during the Blitz

The damaged Peter Robinson department store at Oxford Circus, following a German air raid on London, September 1940. Second World War Two

Oxford Street, London’s famous shopping boulevard, suffered heavy damage from German bombing during the Second World War.

On the night of 17-18 September, 1940, some of London’s best-known establishments were hit.

This photograph shows the destroyed façade of the Peter Robinson department store at Oxford Circus. The business was founded in 1833.

On this day: Reconstruction in London

EPSON scanner image

This image, taken on the 14th of July, 1955, shows reconstruction in the City of London. The scaffolding surrounds what was left of the church of All Hallows-by-the-Tower after extensive German bombing during the Second World War.

The Tower of London can be seen in the background.

The destruction was particularly devastating as a church had stood on the site since the year 675.

Women’s London: A Tour Guide to Great Lives by Rachel Kolsky

Women's London A Tour Guide to Great Lives by Rachel Kolsky

Women’s London is the only guidebook that focuses on the women who have shaped London through the centuries and the legacy they have left behind. This new book provides the perfect opportunity to explore sights, statues, plaques and buildings associated with famous and some not so famous women who have left their mark on London’s heritage, culture and society. Their stories include scientists and suffragettes, reformers and royals, military and medical pioneers, authors and artists, fashion and female firsts … and more. The author, a popular London tour guide and lecturer, specialises in women’s history and has provided a series of original self-guided walking tours taking you to historic areas where important women lived, worked and are commemorated. Illustrated with new full-colour photography and specially commissioned maps, Women’s London will inspire visitors and Londoners alike to discover how much London owes to women.

Women’s London: A Tour Guide to Great Lives by Rachel Kolsky

It’s always nice to have historical nonfiction that tells the stories of women. For centuries the world in general has perpetuated the myth that men were the only people who ever achieved anything, which of course is incorrect.

Women’s London gives you information about some of history’s most famous women, but it also tells you some stories about the lesser-known women in the history of the city. For example, we learn of London’s first female cab driver (women were barred from the profession until 1977!).

While interesting, the copy of the book I read had some very problematic formatting. Even big-name guidebook companies like Lonely Planet struggle to make their ebooks accessible, so that’s no surprise.

An interesting book, with some layout issues that will confuse you.

 

Review copy provided by NetGalley.

On this day: the Victoria Memorial is Unveiled

Inauguration_du_Monument_de_la_reine_Victoria The Victoria Memorial's unveiling ceremony outside Buckingham Palace London 16th May 1911

The Victoria Memorial, which stands outside Buckingham Palace at the end of The Mall in London, was unveiled in a ceremony on the 16th of May, 1911.

The monument honours Queen Victoria, whose long reign had come to an end with her death a decade earlier.

The ceremony was presided over by both by King George V and his first cousin, Wilhelm II of Germany. Both men were grandsons of Victoria.

Following the ceremony it was revealed the memorial’s sculpture, Thomas Brock, was to be knighted.

On this day: a Coronation in London

The Coronation of George VI, The Mall, 12 May 1937. The Royal Coach left for Westminster Abbey for the Coronation of King George and Queen Elizabeth. Picture taken from the roof of Bucki

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This photograph, taken from the rooftop of Buckingham Palace in London, shows the coronation procession of the new king, George VI and his queen Elizabeth on the 12th of May, 1937. The Royal Coach is seen leaving for Westminster Abbey, where the coronation was to happen.

George would be king until his death in 1952. His daughter Elizabeth inherited the throne in February of that year.