On this day: the Coronation of King Edward VII and Queen Alexandra

Edward_VIIs_coronation_procession_London_9_August_1902Procession passing along a busy London thoroughfare during the Coronation of King Edward VII and Queen Alexandra (1841-1910) on 9 Au

The Procession in State through London’s streets.

The coronation of Britain’s King Edward VII and Queen Alexandra took place on the 9th of August, 1902, more than a year and a half after the death of Queen Victoria, Edward’s mother and predecessor.

The coronation, initially set for the 26th of June, was postponed because of the King’s ill health. This caused significant problems for many people. Numerous functions had been planned for the day, and foreign dignitaries were in London to celebrate. Additionally, rooms on the parade route across London had been rented for high prices, which resulted in landmark court cases when the customers missed out.

From his sickbed Edward insisted that the “Coronation Dinner for the Poor of London” go ahead as planned, and 500 000 meals were served.

The Procession in State – pictured above on revised August date – was supposed to include military units from a number of European countries, but they all had to return home before the coronation finally took place.

A second procession following the one on the day of the coronation was also postponed until the end of October, again because the King was in poor health.

Edward, overweight and a heavy smoker, died less than eight years after his coronation.

Alexandra lived another fifteen and a half years after her husband’s death.

 

 

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On this day: A King’s Coronation

City_of_London_(14929011094)Sir Marcus Samuel, Lord Mayor of London makes his way to Westminster Abbey from Guildhall for the Coronation of Edward VII on Saturday 9th August 1902.

The Coronation of Edward VII took place in London on Saturday the 9th of August, 1902, more than a year and a half after the death of the King’s mother and predecessor, Queen Victoria. The event had been postponed due to the King’s ill health.

In this photograph Sir Marcus Samuel, Lord Mayor of London, travels to Westminster Abbey from Guildhall for the event.

He travels in the Lord Mayor’s State Coach, which was built in Holborn in 1757.

The new King reigned until his death in May, 1910.

On this day: the Queen Mother in 1979

Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother is seen here at the opening of the new library of the London School of Economics on the 10th of July, 1979.

The library – located in the Lionel Robbins Building – is in the former headquarters of major bookseller WH Smith.

Sources: 1234

HM_Queen_Mother_at_the_formal_opening_of_the_new_library_in_the_Lionel_Robbins_Building,_10th_July_1979_(3982886515) London

1979 London British Royals England Britain VintageHM_Queen_Mother_at_the_formal_opening_of_the_new_library_in_the_Lionel_Robbins_Building,_10th_July_1979_(39828

HM_Queen_Mother_at_the_formal_opening_of_the_new_library_in_the_Lionel_Robbins_Building,_10th_July_1979_(3982886717)With Jacqueline Whiteside, library assistant.

HM Queen Mother at the formal opening of the new library in the Lionel Robbins Building, 10th July 1979 London British Royals England Britain Vintage

On this day: Queen Victoria in London

Her_Majesty_Greeting_her_People,_Diamond_Jubilee_Pageant,_London,_England Queen Victoria riding a coach through a crowd of onlookers during her Diamond Jubilee procession. 22nd June 1897

Link to enlarge the image.

This photograph was taken in London on the 22nd of June, 1897. Queen Victoria, then aged seventy-eight, takes part in a procession in honour of her Diamond Jubilee – sixty years on the British throne.

The Queen would die less than four years after this image was taken.

100 years ago today: Edith Cavell returns home

Nurse Cavell at Westminster Abbey - After the Armistice her body was brought in state at Westminster Abbey, 15th May 1919.

From the collection of the Imperial War Museums

The body of British nurse Edith Cavell is depicted here being taken to Westminster Abbey in London for a state funeral on the 15th of May, 1919. The image was created by English artist Henry Rushbury.

Cavell, who had helped Allied soldiers escape German-occupied Belgium during the First World War, was arrested by German authorities and executed by firing squad on the 12th of October, 1915.

Cavell’s killing sparked international outrage, and the incident was used in war propaganda in the years following her death.