On this day: the aftermath of an air raid

Air_Raid_Damage_in_the_United_Kingdom_1939-1945_H8138 British troops of Western Command clearing up bomb damage in Birkenhead, Cheshire, 15 March 1941. Second World War World War Two

The British Army cleans up after an air raid on Birkenhead, England in this photograph dated the 15th of March, 1941.

The Blitz, Germany’s bombing offensive against the United Kingdom, ran from September 1940 to May 1941, and attacked London as well as the UK’s major ports and industrial cities.


On this day: Soldiers are Welcomed Home

Adelaide, SA. 14 March 1942. Troops of the 7th Australian Division receive a welcome from the people of the suburbs of Adelaide as they pass through on their way to Adelaide from the doc

From the collection of the Australian War Memorial, Canberra.

This image, dated the 14th of March, 1942, shows a train of soldiers of the 7th Division being welcomed home by women and children in the suburbs of Adelaide, South Australia. They had just disembarked from His Majesty’s Transport Orcades and were returning from fighting in the Middle East.

This division of the Australian Army was formed in February of 1940, as part of the Second Australian Imperial Force in the Second World War.

On this day: Italian defeat in Libya

Wrecked_Italian_aircraft_at_Tripoli_1943Wrecked Italian Fiat CR.42 and G.50 aircraft at Castel Benito airport, Tripoli, Libya, in 1943. 10th March 1943. Second World War. World War Two.

From the collection of the Australian War Memorial, Canberra.

Early in the twentieth century Italy took control of the North African nation of Libya. The country became known as Italian Libya after their victory in the Italo-Turkish War of 1911-12. However the Italians, aligned with Nazi Germany, began to lose ground in Africa as they were pushed back by the Allied troops in the early 1940s.

Many Muslim Libyans chose to fight with Italy during the Second World War, but by February of 1943 the Axis powers were forced out of the country, ending decades of Italian control.

The photograph above is dated the 10th of March, and was taken by the Australian armed forces as they advanced on Axis territory. It shows wrecked Italian aircraft at the destroyed Castel Benito airport in the capital city, Tripoli.


On this day: a Royal Navy ship under construction

The Royal Navy’s HMS Ark Royal is photographed here under construction in Wallsend, England on the 10th of March, 1981.

HMS Ark Royal was the former flagship of the Royal Navy. Keel was laid by Swan Hunter at Wallsend on 7th December 1978 and launched on 20th June 1981

The ship was launched in June of the same year.

HMS_Ark_Royal_-_Launch_-_20th_JUNE_1981 HMS Ark Royal is launched. 20th June 1981.



On this day: the Battle of Manila

Manila_Walled_City_Destruction_May_1945 Destruction at the Walled City (Intramuros district) of old Manila in May 1945 — after the Battle of Manila.

Aerial shot of the destruction in Manila. May 1945. X

One of the bloodiest battles in world history, the Battle of Manila (in the Philippines) ended on the 3rd of March, 1945.

Fought by the combined forces of the US and Filipino troops against Japan, the conclusion of the battle marked the end of Japanese control of the region.

U.S. troops at the Rizal Baseball Stadium, Manila, Philippines. 16th February 1945.

US troops stand in a destroyed baseball stadium.

In the month-long campaign over 100 000 civilians were killed, and Manila, the country’s capital city, was completely destroyed.


On this day: Manila in Wartime

U.S. troops at the Rizal Baseball Stadium, Manila, Philippines. 16th February 1945.

US troops stand in the Rizal Baseball Stadium in Manila in the Philippines on the 16th of February, 1945.

The Japanese had occupied the country for nearly three years. Two weeks before this image was taken, the Battle of Manila began, a fight for liberation that killed over 100 000 civilians and razed the city to the ground.

A combined force of American and Filipino troops finally defeated Japan at the beginning of March.


On this day: Australian Troops in Libya

Tobruk Libya 22 January 1941. Members of C Company Australian 2-11th Infantry Battalion having penetrated the outer defences of Tobruk, assemble on the south side of the harbour after at

Australian troops photographed by Frank Hurley in Tobruk on the 22nd of January, 1941.

The harbour town in Libya became the focus of a 241-day siege a few months later. 14 000 Australians – known as the Rats of Tobruk – fought a combined force of Nazis and Italians. Control of the town was crucial to Allied interests in North Africa.