On this day…

Freed Korean “Comfort Women” – women forced to work as sex slaves for the Empire of Japan during the Second World War – talk to US soldiers in a photograph dated the 14th of August, 1944.

It is estimated that hundreds of thousands of women from Asia, as well as several hundred from the Netherlands and Australia, were treated this way.

Captured_comfort_women_in_Myitkyina_on_August_14_in_1944 Comfort Women - women forced to work as sex slaves for the Empire of Japan - after being freed by US soldiers. 14th August 1944. X

Here is the official caption of the photograph:

“Three Korean “comfort girls” (captured in Burma), photographed while being interrogated by Capt. Won Loy Chan (San Francisco, California), Tech. Sgt. Robert Honda (Hawaii) and Sgt. Hirabayashi (Seattle, Washington), all of the G-2 Myitkyina Task Force of the U.S. Army.”

On this day: the Jolimont Centre siege

js-1On the 29th of November, 1993 a man by the name of Felipe Ruizdiaz went on a rampage in Canberra, Australia’s capital city. Ruizdiaz

On the 29th of November, 1993 a man by the name of Felipe Ruizdiaz went on a rampage in Canberra, Australia’s capital city. Ruizdiaz, 47, shot the manager at Dickson Swimming Pool before driving his ute, filled with gas canisters and petrol, to the Jolimont Centre in Canberra’s city centre.

Jolimont_Centre_siege_1993In what was believed to be a revenge attack on his estranged wife

In what was believed to be a revenge attack on his estranged wife, he drove into the entrance of the multi-storey building and began to throw petrol bombs before shooting at emergency service members who responded to the incident.

Ruizdiaz eventually shot and killed himself.

js-2On the 29th of November, 1993 a man by the name of Felipe Ruizdiaz went on a rampage in Canberra, Australia’s capital city. Ruizdiaz

A radio station located in the building continued to broadcast throughout the attack.

When Australian women were accidentally given the vote.

Australian Suffragettes

Australian suffragettes in London in 1911

In the nineteenth century, in the colony of Victoria in Australia, the Electoral Act 1863 was passed. According to the act, “all persons” who owned property were entitled to vote. Though it was not intended to include women in this, there were plenty in the state who did, indeed own property.

In the 1864 elections, some women took advantage of this error and went to the polling stations, where their votes were recorded:

The Argus  , 5 November 1864, p 4. When women in Australia accidentally got the vote.

“At one of the polling booths in the Castlemaine district a novel sight was witnessed. A coach filled with ladies drove up, and the fair occupants alighted and recorded their votes.”
The Argus , 5 November 1864, p 4.

The oversight was quickly fixed, and a new law in 1865 once again took voting rights away from women. However, Australia was very early in granting women full voting rights, in 1902.

 

 

On this day: a suffragette march in New York

Some 20 000 women marched in New York City on the 23rd of October, 1915. In the lead up to an election, women demanded the right to vote.

It was another five years before women nation-wide in the United States received that right.

Source

Pre-election_suffrage_parade_NYCPre-election suffrage parade, New York City, October 23, 1915. 20,000 women marched.

The twentieth anniversary of the Atlanta Olympics bombing.

Flags fly at half-mast at the 1996 Atlanta Olympics after two were killed and 111 injured in a bombing for an anti-abortion and anti-gay agenda.

Olympic Park in Atlanta, Georgia, USA was bombed on the 27th of July, 1996. Two people were killed and 111 injured when Eric Robert Rudolph placed a US military pack containing three pipe bombs surrounded by nails in the so-called “town square” of the Olympic venue.

He later said he committed the attack because he didn’t agree with women having the right to abortion.

Atlanta_Olympic_Park_Bomb_AftermathFlags fly at half-mast at the 1996 Atlanta Olympics after two were killed and 111 injured in a bombing for an anti-abortion and anti-gay agenda.

Rudolph later confessed to the bombings of women’s health clinics and gay bars.

On this day: the Women’s Journal Cover

The edition of the Women’s Journal from the 8th of March, 1913 reports on the suffragette march in Washington D.C. five days earlier.

Even though it was one of the most influential of marches of its kind, more than two-hundred people had to be treated in hospital after being attacked by mostly male crowds who were against giving women the vote.

Woman's Journal of March 8, 1913.