On this day: 4th of July in NYC

4th July 1918: The Untied States’ Independence Day is celebrated with a parade on New York City’s Fifth Avenue.

Behind the man marching is Cornelius Vanderbilt II House, on the corner of 57th Street, which was demolished in 1927 to build the Bergdorf Goodman department store

From the collection of the Library of Congress.

July_4th_parade_LOC_28705978521Fourth of July parade Fifth Avenue New York City 1918 background Cornelius Vanderbilt II House occupying northwest corner of Fifth Avenue and 57th Street d

On this day: A Bushranger in Glenrowan

For a fairly morbid post: here is an image of a member of Australian bushranger (highwayman) Ned Kelly’s gang being photographed on the 29th of June, 1880.

This is Joe Byrne, who was killed the day before in the infamous siege in Glenrowan, in the colony of Victoria.

Source: the National Museum of Australia, Canberra.

Byrne_480w Joe Byrne’s body being photographed after the siege at Glenrowan, 29 June 1880. Ned Kelly Australian Bushranger.

The image is recognised as the first press photograph in Australian history.

Byrne was twenty-three when he died.

Joseph Byrne 21 November 1856–28 June 1880 was an Australian bushranger born in Victoria to an Irish immigrant. A friend of Ned Kelly he was a member of the Kelly Gang who were declared outlaws the murder of three police

Bushrangers terrorised the Australian colonies for much of the nineteenth century, but Glenrowan was something of a turning point. The improvements in communication technology and the arrival of the railway meant bushrangers found it harder to commit their crimes.

The Landowner's Secret by Sonya Heaney blog-sized

My book The Landowner’s Secret takes place shortly after these events, and deals with the threat of bushrangers.

On this day: the beginning of World War One

Franz Ferdinand, archduke of Austria, and his wife Sophie riding in an open carriage at Sarajevo shortly before their assassination. First World War ONe 28th June 1914

Source

Austrian Archduke Franz Ferdinand and his wife Sophie ride in an open carriage in Sarajevo on the 28th of June, 1914. Soon afterwards, while on this carriage journey, they were assassinated by Bosnian Serb Yugoslav nationalist Gavrilo Princip.

The assassinations sparked the First World War.

On this day: the Women’s Auxiliary Air Force is Formed

Waaf Australian Auxiliary Air Force REcruitment Poster Second World War Two 1940s

Second World War recruitment poster.

Britain’s Women’s Auxiliary Air Force, whose members were known as WAAFs, was formed on the 28th of June, 1939, shortly before the outbreak of the Second World War. Conscription of women began in 1941.

Women in the organisation worked in many fields, from parachute packing to meteorology, aircraft maintenance, and work with codes, in addition to catering and nursing.

Two WAAF cooks at an Royal Air Force aerodrome, following recipes for a hundred pies and a hundred scones. September 1940.

Two WAAF cooks at an Royal Air Force aerodrome, following recipes for a hundred pies and a hundred scones. September 1940. X

By 1943 over 2000 women were enlisting a week, bringing the force’s numbers to a peak of over 180 000.

At the end of the war numbers reduced significantly, and the WAAF was turned into the  Women’s Royal Air Force in 1949.

On this day…

Mrs Emmeline Pankhurst, Leader of the Women’s Suffragette movement, is arrested outside Buckingham Palace while trying to present a petition to King George V.

The Imperial War Museum dates this photograph as the 21st of May, 1914.

Mrs Emmeline Pankhurst, Leader of the Women's Suffragette movement, is arrested outside Buckingham Palace while trying to present a petition to King George V in May 1914. 21 May 1914

On this day: the end of the war

7th May 1945 Two women stand on Saint Catherine Street reading the front page of The Montreal Daily Star. The newspaper announces Germany Quit - signalling the end of the Second World War in Europe.

7th May 1945: Two women stand on Saint Catherine Street, reading the front page of The Montreal Daily Star. The newspaper announces “Germany Quit” – signalling the end of the Second World War in Europe.

Canada declared war on Germany on the 10th of September, 1939.

On this day: the sinking of the Lusitania

British ocean liner RMS Lusitania was sunk by a German U-boat on the 7th of May, 1915, less than a year into the First World War. 1198 out of 1959 people aboard were killed, and the sinking played a big hand in turning international opinion against Germany.

This propaganda poster was released in Britain the same year, in an attempt to recruit men into the Leicestershire Regiment (now the Royal Leicestershire Regiment).

Leicestershire_Regiment_recruiting_poster_1915 Recruiting poster for the Leicestershire Regiment Men Of Leicestershire. Avenge The Lusitania. How To Do It Britain First World War One

On this day: Frenchwomen finally vote

After decades of campaigning, the women of France voted for the first time on the 29th of April, 1945, when municipal elections were held. Legislation for women’s suffrage had been passed in October the year before.

While late, France wasn’t the last European country to grant women the vote. Women’s suffrage came even later in Italy, Greece, San Marino, Monaco, Andorra and Switzerland. Liechtenstein was the last to adopt equal voting rights – only in 1984.

This image from May of 1935 is of French suffragette Louise Weiss demonstrating alongside women holding papers saying The Frenchwoman Must Vote.

Suffragettes in France demonstrate in May of 1935. French women didn't win the vote until the mid-1940s. Louise Weiss along with other suffragettes in 1935. The bold text on the newspape