Nineteen Years

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Today is the nineteenth anniversary of the start of the Russian apartment bombings, when Vladimir Putin orchestrated a series of attacks that killed hundreds of citizens across Russia in order to boost his popularity and win the presidency.

Before the first apartment bombing, a shopping mall in Moscow was attacked on the 31st of August.

The first apartment attack occurred in Buynaksk, where sixty-four people were killed and 133 were injured. The two bombings in Moscow that followed killed over 200, and an attack in Volgodonsk killed 17.

In total 293 were killed and over a thousand were injured.

Putin blamed the attacks on a group from Dagestan, and used it as an excuse for a second war in Chechnya, boosting his approval ratings and helping him to power.

Three key people trying to reveal the truth about what happened were assassinated in the years that followed: Sergei Yushenkov, Yuri Shchekochikhin, and Alexander Litvinenko – who defected to Britain and was infamously poisoned by Russian agents in a London restaurant in 2006.

Additionally, Mikhail Trepashkin spent years in a Russian prison for his role in the investigation.

Bombing at Guryanova Street in Moscow, where 94 were killed.

These tactics were also used by the Soviets, such as when they blew up their own people at a border post as an excuse to start the Winter War with Finland in 1939. The result of this was that Finland fought with the Nazis in the Second World War.

In the past few years, with Kremlin manipulation of internet search results, factual reports of the apartment bombing incidents are harder to come by. Just like with news about anything else (e.g. Ukraine), these days top English-language (and Spanish and French etc.) Google results usually link to sites like RT (Russia Today), Tass, and Sputnik – all of them Kremlin-backed propaganda agencies.

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On this day: a President on Tour

Theodore Roosevelt, during his New England tour, at Lake Sunapee in New Hampshire. 29th August 1902

29th August 1902: US President Theodore Roosevelt visits Lake Sunapee in the state of New Hampshire.

The details of the photograph note:

In the photograph are George B. Cortelyou, Roosevelt’s future secretary of Commerce and Labor, on Roosevelt’s right, and William Craig, the first Secret Service agent ever killed in the line of duty, on the far right in the photograph.

Craig died five days later. Roosevelt was President from September 1901 to March 1909.

On this day: Nixon’s Secretary Dies

Rose Mary Woods, secretary to doomed US President Richard Nixon, died on the 22nd of January, 2005 at the age of eighty-seven. The Ohio-born woman who lost her fiancé in the Second World War is infamous for her part in the 1970s Watergate scandal that eventually resulted in Nixon’s resignation.

Rose Mary Woods demonstrates how she claims she erased Watergate scandal tapes. President Richard Nixon Secretary. 1970s.

Woods can be seen above demonstrating the so-called “Rose Mary Stretch”. She claimed this was how potentially incriminating tapes connected to the Watergate scandal were “accidentally” deleted.

Nixon ended up resigning over the scandal before he could be impeached.

On this day: a President and “the King”

Elvis Presley meeting Richard Nixon. On December 21, 1970, at his own request, Presley met thr then-President Elvis is on the right. Said to be 'of the two greatest recording artists of

At the singer’s request, rock and roll icon Elvis Presley met US President Richard Nixon in the Oval Office of the White House on the 21st of December, 1970.

A few years later Nixon resigned following his involvement in the Watergate scandal. Presley died in August of 1977.

Because of the tapes involved in Watergate, this photo is now sometimes captioned:

The two greatest recording artists of the 20th century.

On this day: A Protest in Washington

Impeach_Nixon_retouched 22nd October 1973 Impreach Nixon Watergate scandal 1970s Washington D.C.

This photograph, dated the 22nd of October, 1973 shows people demonstrating in Washington D.C., calling for the impeachment of US President Richard Nixon.

The protest came in the middle of the Watergate scandal, when Nixon lied about his involvement in the break-in at the Democratic National Committee headquarters.

This was less than two weeks after the resignation of Vice President Agnew because of criminal charges of bribery, tax evasion and money laundering. Agnew was later convicted.

Nixon resigned in August of 1974 to avoid almost certain impeachment.

On this day: a President Resigns

Oliver F. Atkins' photo of Nixon leaving the White House shortly before his resignation became effective, 9th August 1974.

These images, taken by Oliver F. Atkins on the 9th of August, 1974, show US President Richard Nixon leaving the White House after resigning. The resignation came into effect shortly after.

Nixon-departOliver F. Atkins_ photo of Nixon leaving the White House on Marine One shortly before his resignation became effective, August 9, 1974.

Republican Nixon gave up the Presidency following the Watergate scandal, in which he tried to cover up his involvement in a break-in at the Democratic National Committee headquarters.