Book Feature: Lost Railway Journeys from Around the World

Tomorrow is the 189th anniversary of the opening of the world’s first steam-powered public railway: the Liverpool and Manchester Railway.

So, for the occasion, here’s a book I received as an ARC a while ago, but never had the time to review: Lost Railway Journeys from Around the World by Anthony Lambert. The description is beneath the cover.

Lost Railway Journeys from Around the World by Anthony Lambert

From the great cathedral-like railways stations of the steam age to obscure lines built through spectacular landscapes to open up countries before the advent of motorised road transport, this book is a celebration of our lost railway heritage and the lines that can no longer be travelled.

Through stunning images, Lost Railway Journeys evokes the romance and drama of these journeys, taking the reader as close as they can possibly get to this lost world of dining cars, sleeping cars, station porters and international rail travel.

Organised by continent, all of these routes have stories to tell and the lost journeys are captured in the old postcards and posters that accompany photographs drawn from collections and archives across the world.

On this day: a final railway journey in England

EPSON scanner image

The passenger train at Tenterden Town railway station in England runs for the last time on the 2nd of January, 1954. All railway traffic ceased in 1961. The locomotive was built in 1896, and rebuilt in 1908.

Tenterden is in Kent in the south of the country, and the railway opened in the year 1900.

Today, a tourist heritage railway operates.

On this day: a Rail Disaster in London

 

The scene looking south over the aftermath of the Harrow and Wealdstone train crash on 8 October 1952. The United Kingdom's worst peacetime rail disaster.

The United Kingdom’s worst peacetime rail disaster occurred at London’s Harrow and Wealdstone station on the 8th of October, 1952.

The scene looking south over the aftermath of the Harrow and Wealdstone train crash on 8 October 1952.Rescue workers around wrecked coaches after the Harrow and Wealdstone train crash on

112 people were killed when the City of Glasgow – an express train from Perth, Scotland – crashed into the back of a local passenger train at rush hour. The wreckage covered other rail lines, resulting in a third train – another express – to crash.

The scene looking south over the aftermath of the Harrow and Wealdstone train crash on 8 October 1952. The badly damaged locomotive of the Perth express train No. 46242 Coronation Class

The wrecked City of Glasgow.

In addition to over a hundred deaths, 340 other people were injured, with 88 transported to hospital for treatment.

The overturned second Liverpool locomotive No. 46202 and wrecked coaches after the Harrow and Wealdstone train crash on 8 October 1952.

An investigation found that the driver of the Perth train missed three signals before crashing, but as those involved were killed, the reason for this was never discovered.