On this day…

Newlay & Horsforth station in West Yorkshire photographed on the 26th of June, 1964. The line was later electrified, but this station closed the year after the pictures were taken.

Newlay & Horsforth stat View westward, towards Shipley, Bradford, Skipton etc. The line has since been electrified, but Newlay & Horsforth station was closed on 22-3-65. 26th June 1964

EPSON scanner image

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On this day: a last train in Adelaide

Adelaide, South Australia on the 31st of May, 1914. It was the last day the Glenelg train came up King William Street.

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King William Street, Adelaide, South Australia on the 31st of May, 1914. It was the last day the Glenelg train came up King William Street.

On this day: a Station in Wales

Buckley Junction Station Flintshire Wales 20th May 1961

This photograph is dated the 20th of May, 1961, and is of Buckley Junction Station.

Buckley, a village in the Flintshire region of Wales, is known for its distinct dialect. The unique way of speech is dying out as people come and go from the area.

On this day: a Derailment in Victorian England

BASA-3K-7-518-56Seen here after derailing in a blizzard near Camborne, Cornwall on 8 March 1891.Great Western Railway No. 2128 Leopard (ex South Devon Railway Leopard). Victorian Era

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8th March 1891: A derailment on England’s Great Western Railway. The locomotive is photographed after being caught in a blizzard in Cornwall, near Camborne.

Thomas Hardy’s Early Career

Thomas Hardy, OM (2 June 1840 – 11 January 1928) was an English novelist and poet. A Victorian realist in the tradition of George Eliot, influenced both in his novels and in his poetry

Today marks ninety years since the death of Thomas Hardy, famed English novelist of the Victorian era.

His famous works include Far from the Madding Crowd (1874), The Mayor of Casterbridge (1886), Tess of the d’Urbervilles (1891), and Jude the Obscure (1895).

However, when Dorset-born Hardy first came to London, he was not making money as a writer.

St Pancras Railway Station London Victorian Era the year it opened 1868

In 1868

One of his jobs was to clear graves to make way for the massive new St Pancras railway station, which opened in 1868.

The Hardy Tree in the churchyard of St Pancras Old Church, growing up between gravestones moved there while Thomas Hardy was working here. London Victorian Era.

Headstones were moved for the build, and stacked together. Today, there is a famous spot called the “Hardy Tree“, where – for the past 1.5 centuries – a tree has grown around them.