On this day: Women Demonstrate in Scotland

_The_Great_Procession_and_Women's_Demonstration_,_1909_on_Princes_Street,_EdinburghThe Great Procession and Women's Demonstration - Edinburgh. 9th October 1909. Scotland. Women's Suffrag

This photograph shows the so-called Great Procession and Women’s Demonstration that took place in Edinburgh, Scotland on the 9th of October, 1909.

Amongst the banners being carried are those calling for Votes for Women. Women in the United Kingdom were not given equal voting rights as men until 1928.

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Scotland 1917

January 1917: A group of women in Leith, Midlothian, Scotland paint the hull of a Royal Navy Motor Launch with anti-fouling paint on a snowy day. First World War.

Leith, Midlothian, Scotland_Art_IWMART1364 January 1917 First World War One A group of women at work painting the hull of a Royal Navy Motor Launch with anti-fouling paint.

Christmas 1941

Christmas_dinner_celebrations_on_board_HMS_WESTMINSTER_at_Rosyth,_December_1941__A6484Christmas dinner celebrations on board HMS Westminster at Rosyth, Scotland. 25th December 1941. Roya

Source

Christmas dinner celebrations on board HMS Westminster on the 25th of December, 1941, while the warship was docked at Rosyth, Scotland. The ship served in – and survived – both the First and Second World Wars, and was then sold for scrap in 1947.

One Hundred Years Ago

The German Fleet at Anchor off Inchkeith, Firth of Forth - after the Surrender, 22nd November 1918. First World War One War Art. Scotland. Britain.

Source

This painting, created in 1919, shows the German fleet surrendered in Scotland in 1918, eleven days after the end of the First World War. The caption by Britain’s Imperial War Museum is below:

The German Fleet at Anchor off Inchkeith, Firth of Forth – after the Surrender, 22nd November 1918.

On this day: a Rail Disaster in London

 

The scene looking south over the aftermath of the Harrow and Wealdstone train crash on 8 October 1952. The United Kingdom's worst peacetime rail disaster.

The United Kingdom’s worst peacetime rail disaster occurred at London’s Harrow and Wealdstone station on the 8th of October, 1952.

The scene looking south over the aftermath of the Harrow and Wealdstone train crash on 8 October 1952.Rescue workers around wrecked coaches after the Harrow and Wealdstone train crash on

112 people were killed when the City of Glasgow – an express train from Perth, Scotland – crashed into the back of a local passenger train at rush hour. The wreckage covered other rail lines, resulting in a third train – another express – to crash.

The scene looking south over the aftermath of the Harrow and Wealdstone train crash on 8 October 1952. The badly damaged locomotive of the Perth express train No. 46242 Coronation Class

The wrecked City of Glasgow.

In addition to over a hundred deaths, 340 other people were injured, with 88 transported to hospital for treatment.

The overturned second Liverpool locomotive No. 46202 and wrecked coaches after the Harrow and Wealdstone train crash on 8 October 1952.

An investigation found that the driver of the Perth train missed three signals before crashing, but as those involved were killed, the reason for this was never discovered.

On this day: Troops on the March

The_Race_To_the_Sea,_September-october_1914_First World War 5th October 1914 French Cavalry passing the 1st Battalion, Cameronians (Scottish Rifles), with the rest of the 19th Brigade, t

The march to the sea. First World War.

5th October 1914: French Cavalry on the march pass troops of the 1st Battalion, Cameronians (Scottish Rifles). The British soldiers slept hidden during the day and marched at night.

Germany had declared war on France two months earlier. The photograph is credited to British Army officer Robert Cotton Money (1888-1985).

On this day: the birth of the Duchess of Northumberland

Elizabeth Diana Percy, Duchess of Northumberland (née Montagu Douglas Scott; 20 January 1922 – 19 September 2012)

Photographed as a teenager in 1935.

Elizabeth Diana Percy, Duchess of Northumberland (née Montagu Douglas Scott) was born on the 20th of January, 1922, to parents the future Duke and Duchess of Buccleuch.

During the Second World War she served in both the Civil Nursing Reserve and the Women’s Royal Naval Service, and worked on the RMS Mauretania and in Australia.

She married Hugh Percy, 10th Duke of Northumberland in 1946 and went on to have seven children. Her husband ascended to the title after his brother, the 9th Duke, was killed in action in the war in 1940.

The Duchess outlived her husband, dying in Surrey, England in 2012.