On this day: Coventry in Ruins

The English city of Coventry suffered numerous Nazi bombing attacks in the blitz of 1940, but the worst came in November.

The city was bombarded from the 14th to the 15th, killing hundreds of people and injuring many hundreds more.

Coventry_devastation_H_5601A street in Coventry, England, after the Coventry Blitz of 14–15 November 1940. In the background are the tower and spire of Holy Trinity parish church. 16th

Coventry_bomb_damage_H5600Broadgate in Coventry city centre following the Coventry Blitz of 14-15 November 1940. The burnt out shell of the Owen Owen department store (opened in 1937) 16

These photographs were taken on the 16th, showing many buildings ruined, and the recently built Owen Owen department store – the exterior still stands, but the inside was destroyed.

Coventry_Cathedral_after_the_air_raid_in_1940The ruined nave and chancel of Coventry Cathedral, England, seen from the west tower. It is in ruins after the German air raid of November 19

Coventry Cathedral was largely ruined, and still stands as a shell today. The new cathedral was built next door, and opened in 1962.

Hundreds more people were killed in German bombings the following year.

On this day: the Coventry Blitz

A wrecked bus is photographed amongst the destruction in Coventry, England after a German Luftwaffe air raid on the night of 14-15 November, 1940.

Coventry suffered heavy damage in the Second World War. The city’s famous cathedral was one of the casualties of the “Coventry Blitz”, which killed many hundreds and left thousands without homes.

From the collection of the Imperial War Museum.

A wrecked bus stands among a scene of devastation in the centre of Coventry after the major Luftwaffe air raid on the night of 14-15 November 1940. Second World War Two England United Ki

On this day: London on Fire

This photograph, showing smoke and fire drifting across Tower Bridge and the River Thames in London after a German bombing raid, was taken on the 7th of September, 1940.

This was the first major Nazi attack on the city in the Second World War.

Source

Second World War Two Picture taken during first mass air raid on London 7th September 1940 describes more than words ever could, the scene in London's dock area. Tower Bridge against a b

On this day: Oxford Street during the Blitz

The damaged Peter Robinson department store at Oxford Circus, following a German air raid on London, September 1940. Second World War Two

Oxford Street, London’s famous shopping boulevard, suffered heavy damage from German bombing during the Second World War.

On the night of 17-18 September, 1940, some of London’s best-known establishments were hit.

This photograph shows the destroyed façade of the Peter Robinson department store at Oxford Circus. The business was founded in 1833.

On this day: the aftermath of an air raid

Air_Raid_Damage_in_the_United_Kingdom_1939-1945_H8138 British troops of Western Command clearing up bomb damage in Birkenhead, Cheshire, 15 March 1941. Second World War World War Two

The British Army cleans up after an air raid on Birkenhead, England in this photograph dated the 15th of March, 1941.

The Blitz, Germany’s bombing offensive against the United Kingdom, ran from September 1940 to May 1941, and attacked London as well as the UK’s major ports and industrial cities.

The aftermath of an air raid.

London was bombed by the Nazis on the 29th of December, 1940. Now world-famous photographer Cecil Beaton took this image after the attack. The bell towers of St Paul’s Cathedral in the City can be seen in the background, showing how close the internationally-renowned building came to being destroyed.

Some of the most famous images of the Second World War (e.g.) involved the cathedral surviving Nazis bombs.

The Western Bell Towers of St Paul’s Cathedral After the Incendiary Raid of 29 December, London.

Cecil Beaton, 'The Western Bell Towers of St Paul's Cathedral After the Incendiary Raid of 29 December, London', 1940.

Sheila, Denise and the Belfast Blitz.

NIRELAND-BRITAIN-HISTORY-ANIMALS

Belfast was heavily bombed by the Nazis in April and May of 1941, with some 900 people dying.

There were fears of animals at the zoo escaping and stampeding, so orders were given to shoot some of them.

A woman named Denise Weston Austin, one of the zoo’s first female zookeepers, decided to save a baby elephant named Sheila.

Baby elephant, Sheila, who was moved out of Belfast zoo because of fears of a hit from bombers during the Belfast Blitz of 1941.ele2

Because she had high walls around the back of her house, she knew she could hide the animal at night.

Every night after the zoo closed, she sneaked the elephant home on foot, and then returned her in the morning.

Belfast Blitz Sheila the Elepahnt Denise

Sheila survived the war, but died in 1966.

Austin died in 1997, but the identity of the “Elephant Angel” was not discovered until 2009, when a public appeal was launched to find her.

Picture sources:

http://www.belfasttelegraph.co.uk/news/northern-ireland/story-of-how-belfast-zoos-baby-elephant-was-kept-in-backyard-of-home-during-second-world-war-blitz-to-be-made-into-film-29723722.html

http://www.ww2incolor.com/homefront/elephant_1371301c.html