On this day: a last train in Adelaide

Adelaide, South Australia on the 31st of May, 1914. It was the last day the Glenelg train came up King William Street.

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King William Street, Adelaide, South Australia on the 31st of May, 1914. It was the last day the Glenelg train came up King William Street.

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On this day…

Dudley railway station 24th March 1951 West Midlands England Britain Vintage Dudley Station, with the auto-train from Dudley Port

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Dudley railway station in England’s West Midlands, photographed here on the 24th of March, 1951.

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The Victorian-era station was closed in July of 1964.

On this day: a Derailment in Victorian England

BASA-3K-7-518-56Seen here after derailing in a blizzard near Camborne, Cornwall on 8 March 1891.Great Western Railway No. 2128 Leopard (ex South Devon Railway Leopard). Victorian Era

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8th March 1891: A derailment on England’s Great Western Railway. The locomotive is photographed after being caught in a blizzard in Cornwall, near Camborne.

On this day: a Wintry Day in Cheshire

This is the Hartford & Greenbank railway station in Cheshire in England, photographed on a snowy, wintry day: the 28th of December, 1962. This was during the United Kingdom’s infamous winter of 1962-63.

The station, renamed simply Greenbank in 1973 to avoid confusion with another place, opened in 1870 as part of the West Cheshire Railway. It still serves the village of Hartford.

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On this day: the Bray Head railway accident

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On the 9th of August, 1867 sudden subsidence at Brandy Hole Viaduct caused a train to derail.

The location of the disaster was Bray Head, County Wicklow, Ireland. Four people died and twenty-five were injured.

The report into the disaster was published a few weeks later, and can be found in full HERE.

“The train to which this accident happened was the up train leaving Enniscorthy for Dublin, at 6.30 a.m. It consisted of an engine and tender, six carriages, of which the first was fitted with a break, and a guard’s break van. A porter acting as guard rode in this van at the rear of the train. It left Delgany about its proper time, 9.5 a.m., and was travelling slowly round Bray Head in obedience to orders which had been given to all drivers, and had nearly reached this wooden viaduct (called Brabazon corner in the details supplied by the engineer (the late Mr. Brunel), previous to the opening of the line in October 1855), when the acting guard says he got a knock in his van, looked out of the window, and saw the carriages hopping on the rails, and then he put on his break.”