On this day: A Protest in Washington

Impeach_Nixon_retouched 22nd October 1973 Impreach Nixon Watergate scandal 1970s Washington D.C.

This photograph, dated the 22nd of October, 1973 shows people demonstrating in Washington D.C., calling for the impeachment of US President Richard Nixon.

The protest came in the middle of the Watergate scandal, when Nixon lied about his involvement in the break-in at the Democratic National Committee headquarters.

This was less than two weeks after the resignation of Vice President Agnew because of criminal charges of bribery, tax evasion and money laundering. Agnew was later convicted.

Nixon resigned in August of 1974 to avoid almost certain impeachment.

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On this day: American Civil War Propaganda

This poster was printed in Lexington, Kentucky on the 9th of October, 1862. Issued by Confederate supporter and politician Lt. James B. Clay, son of prominent politician Henry Clay, the poster urges the people of the state to resist the Union forces.

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Printed broadside issued by Henry Clay's son, Lt. James B. Clay, in which he makes a plea for Southern sympathizers to defend their homes from Yankee invasion. Lexington, Kentucky. 9 Oct

 

On this day: America’s most lopsided football game

On the 7th of October, 1916, a college football game was played between Cumberland and Georgia Tech in Atlanta, USA. Tech on the left. Score 0 - 222

The infamous game. Georgia Tech on the left. Source.

On the 7th of October, 1916, a college football game was played between Cumberland and Georgia Tech in Atlanta, USA.

GT_Cumberland_222_scoreboardScoreboard at the end of the 1916 Cumberland vs. Georgia Tech football game.

The final scoreboard.

Cumberland, from Tennessee, failed to score at all, leading the most lopsided score in the history of the sport: 0 – 222. The college had already discontinued its football program, but were not allowed to back out of the game.

On this day: an Ammunition Plant Explosion

GillespieExplosion Man standing in a large crater from T. A. Gillespie Company Shell Loading Plant explosion in Sayreville, New Jersey. October 1918. World War One.

A man stands in the crater left by the explosion. October 1918.

Disaster struck New Jersey, USA on the 4th of October, 1918, when an explosion hit the T. A. Gillespie Company Shell Loading Plant. The First World War munitions plant, one of the largest in the world, was hit by a large explosion that started a fire and went on to trigger more explosions over the next two days.

The plant itself, as well as some three-hundred other buildings, were destroyed.

Because employment records were destroyed in the explosion the exact death toll is unclear, however it is believed to be around a hundred. Hundreds of other people were injured.

Residents of Morgan NJ in flight along the road to Perth Amboy and safety from the series of great explosions which destroyed the Shell-loading Plant of T. A. Gillespie & Company. Octobe

Residents being evacuated.

The disaster is generally believed to be an accident.

About a century later, the area is still affected by explosive substances.

On this day: Sequoia National Park is Founded

Sequoia National Park Established 25th September 1890

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Sequoia National Park in California, USA, was established on the 25th of September, 1890.

Ash Mountain Entrance Sign, Sequoia National Park.

In the mid-twentieth century. Source

Famous for its giant sequoia trees, the park is home to the world’s largest tree, and is also famous for preserving a pre-European landscape in the state.