On this day: a Town is Liberated

Group_of_prisoners_who_surrendered_to_Canadians_in_Courseulles Two German officers in a group of prisoners who surrendered to Canadian troops in Courseulles-sur-Mer - June 6, 1944. Secon

This photograph, taken on the 6th of June, 1944, shows German soldiers – including two officers – surrendering to Canadian troops in the French town of Courseulles-sur-Mer.

Below are the Canadians arriving on the beach in their preparations to take over the area.

Taken on D-Day, the first day of the Normandy landings in the Second World War, the town is widely believed to be the first liberated in the massive Allied campaign.

Images of locals and soldiers celebrating Bastille Day together just over a month later can be seen HERE.

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D-Day 1944

Some 156 000 troops from more than a dozen nations were involved in the “D-Day” Normandy landings on the 6th of June, 1944.

This was the beginning of a major Allied push back into western Europe, and a major turning point in the Second World War.

Crossing the English Channel on the way to begin the invasion.

A convoy of Landing Craft Infantry (Large) sails across the English Channel toward the Normandy Invasion beaches on D-Day, 6 June 1944.

British troops come ashore at Gold Beach.

D-day_-_British_Forces_during_the_Invasion_of_Normandy_6_June_1944_B5246Commandos of 47 (RM) Commando coming ashore from LCAs (Landing Craft Assault) on Jig Green beach, Gold area, 6 Jun

US troops on Utah Beach.

Normandy_1 Carrying their equipment, U.S. assault troops move onto Utah Beach. Landing craft can be seen in the background. 6th June 1944 D-Day Normandy landings.

Personnel of the Royal Canadian Navy land on Juno Beach.

Personnel of Royal Canadian Navy Beach Commando W land on Mike Beach sector of Juno Beach, 6 June 1944.

British troops take cover after landing on Sword Beach.

Infantry_waiting_to_move_off_'Queen_White'_BeachBritish troops take cover after landing on Sword Beach. D-Day Normandy landings. 6th june 1944.

On this day: Lord Kitchener reviews troops

Field Marshal Lord Kitchener reviewing 10th (Irish) Division at Basingstoke 1st June 1915. End of June received orders to depart from Hampshire for Gallipoli. First World War One.

1st June 1915: Herbert Kitchener, 1st Earl Kitchener – the famous Lord Kitchener of the World War One recruitment poster – is seen here reviewing the 10th (Irish) Division in Basingstoke, England.

Later that month the troops received their orders to depart for the infamous Gallipoli Campaign.

Herbert Kitchener, 1st Earl Kitchener - the famous Lord Kitchener of the World War One recruitment poster. British.

Kitchener was killed by a German mine the following year, while travelling to Russia aboard the HMS Hampshire.

On this day: Arras in Ruins

This image of Arras, France was taken on the 26th of May, 1917. It shows the Hôtel de Ville (town hall) in ruins.

Arras was near the front line of the First World War, and saw significant battles from as early as 1914.

Ruins_of_the_Hôtel_de_Ville,_Arras_on_26_May_1917 Ruins of the Hôtel de Ville, Arras on 26 May 1917.

On this day: a truce is called

This image, taken on the 24th of May, 1915, shows Australian and Turkish troops collecting the dead after a nine-hour truce was called at the Gallipoli Peninsula in Turkey.

After an attack from the Turks five days earlier that left more than 3000 dead, the stench became so strong both sides agreed to remove the bodies.

The fighting in Turkey came to be commemorated in Australia and New Zealand as Anzac Day on the 25th of April each year.

Anzac_truce_24_May_1915 Scene in no man's land at Anzac during the truce of 24 May 1915, organised to bury the Turkish dead from the attack of 19 May, in which an estimated 3,000 men wer

On this day: the death of a soldier

Light_horse_walersAustralian Imperial Force prior to their departure from Australia in November 1914. right is Trooper William Harry Rankin Woods, 1st Light Horse Regiment, who died of w

Trooper William Harry Rankin

From the collection of the Australian War Memorial, Canberra.

The Australian Imperial Force, the Australian Army’s expeditionary force in the First World War, was formed in August of 1914. The mounted Australian Light Horse made up part of this force.

This photograph was taken in November, 1914. The troops – both lighthorsemen – would soon leave Australia to fight.

Trooper William Harry Rankin is pictured on the right. He would go on to fight at Gallipoli in the Ottoman Empire, where he was killed on the 15th of May, 1915.

Rankin, from the New South Wales town of Mudgee, was thirty-nine at the time of his death.