On this day: the Reichstag in Ruins

Ruins_of_the_Reichstag_in_Berlin,_3_June_1945__BU8573Ruins of the Reichstag in Berlin, Germany. 3rd June 1945. Second World War Two.

This photograph shows the Reichstag in Berlin, Germany in ruins on the 3rd of June, 1945. While the building was not used for the German Parliament during Nazi rule, it was used for propaganda meetings, and for military purposes during the Second World War.

The building suffered heavy damage from Allied bombings, and was considered a prize for the Red Army because of its symbolic significance.

From the collection of the Imperial War Museum.

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100 years ago today: Edith Cavell returns home

Nurse Cavell at Westminster Abbey - After the Armistice her body was brought in state at Westminster Abbey, 15th May 1919.

From the collection of the Imperial War Museums

The body of British nurse Edith Cavell is depicted here being taken to Westminster Abbey in London for a state funeral on the 15th of May, 1919. The image was created by English artist Henry Rushbury.

Cavell, who had helped Allied soldiers escape German-occupied Belgium during the First World War, was arrested by German authorities and executed by firing squad on the 12th of October, 1915.

Cavell’s killing sparked international outrage, and the incident was used in war propaganda in the years following her death.

On this day: a Finnish concentration camp.

24th April 1942: Soviet women eat their breakfast next to a burning pile of rubbish in a Finnish concentration camp in Petrozavodsk, Karelia. The photograph was taken during the Continuation War, during World War Two, when Finland and Nazi Germany fought together against mostly Soviet troops.

Soviet women having breakfast next to a burning pile of rubbish at a Finnish concentration camp in Petrozavodsk, Karelia, during the Continuation War. 24th April 1942. Second World War T

On this day: a warning in Nazi Germany

Warning_sign_in_cologneA Cpl. of 82nd Airborne Division reads a warning sign in the street Cologne, Germany, 4 April 1945. Second World War Two

4th April 1945: A corporal of the US 82nd Airborne Division reads a warning sign in Cologne, Germany as the Second World War draws to an end. Cologne came under Allied control the previous month.

61% of Cologne was destroyed by bombing during the war, and most of the city’s centre was devastated.

On this day: Air Raid Damage in Australia

2nd April 1943: A house in Darwin in Australia’s Northern Territory is severely damaged by a Japanese air raid.

Australia was bombed in about a hundred separate air raids between 1942 and 1943 during the Second World War.

From the collection of the Australian War Memorial, Canberra.

Damaged_house_(Darwin)A house in Darwin damaged in a Japaneses Air Raid. Northern Territory, Australia. Second World War Two. Bombing of Darwin.

Prisoners of War in The Mikado

The_Gala_Performance_-_The_Mikado_at_the_Theatre_of_the_British_Civilian_Pow_Camp_Ruhleben_Germany_Art_IWMART6173 1916 First World War One

The comic opera The Mikado, created by Englishmen Gilbert & Sullivan, premiered at the Savoy Theatre in London on the 14th of March, 1885.

This painting depicts the show being performed in the Ruhleben internment camp west of Berlin in Germany in 1916. British prisoners, interned during the First World War, staged the show from memory.

The painting is by Anglo-Dutch artist Nico Jungmann, who was interned at Ruhleben because he was a naturalised British citizen.

From the collection of the Imperial War Museums.

March 1917

Ruins in the village of Puisieux, Pas-de-Calais, France. March 1917. First World War. The British entered the region on the 28th of February. World War One. By War Photographer Ernest Br

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British troops entered the commune of Puisieux, Pas-de-Calais, France on the 28th of February, 1917, and proceeded to document the destruction they found.

Operations_on_the_Ancre,_January-march_1917_Q1807Ruins in the village of Puisieux, which the British entered on 28th February 1917. First World War. World War One. By War Photographer Er

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The photographs were taken by Ernest Brooks, who was the British military’s first official war photographer, and who made a name for himself documenting the First World War.