On this day: Women’s Suffrage in Norway.

Norwegian women, participating in a woman suffrage parade in New York, 1913. women's suffrage

Norwegian women participate in at a suffrage march in New York in 1913. X

Women in Norway earned the right to vote in stages, however a milestone was reached on the 14th of June, 1907, when middle class women were finally granted permission to vote in parliamentary elections.

While women’s suffrage came fairly early to Norway, by this point in time women in countries such as New Zealand and Australia had had full voting rights for several years.

At the parliamentary election in 1909, women of the bourgeoisie and middle class were entitled to vote for the first time.

Women vote in 1909.

The first Norwegian parliamentary election to include women was held in 1909.

It was not until 1913 that women’s voting rights equal to men’s were granted.

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On this day: the first woman nominated for US President

Victoria_Woodhull_by_Mathew_Brady_c1870 Victoria Claflin Woodhull, later Victoria Woodhull Martin (September 23, 1838 – June 9, 1927) was an American leader of the woman's suffrage mov

Portrait by Mathew Brady

On the 10th of May, 1872, for the first time in the history of the United States, a woman was nominated for President.

Victoria Woodhull, a leader in the women’s suffrage movement, was born in September, 1838. The legality of her nomination is disputed for a number of reasons, including the fact she was under the required minimum age of thirty-five at the time.

She was the candidate for the Equal Rights Party. Though she was unsuccessful, she tried again a number of times over the following couple of decades.

When Australian women were accidentally given the vote.

Australian Suffragettes

Australian suffragettes in London in 1911

In the nineteenth century, in the colony of Victoria in Australia, the Electoral Act 1863 was passed. According to the act, “all persons” who owned property were entitled to vote. Though it was not intended to include women in this, there were plenty in the state who did, indeed own property.

In the 1864 elections, some women took advantage of this error and went to the polling stations, where their votes were recorded:

The Argus  , 5 November 1864, p 4. When women in Australia accidentally got the vote.

“At one of the polling booths in the Castlemaine district a novel sight was witnessed. A coach filled with ladies drove up, and the fair occupants alighted and recorded their votes.”
The Argus , 5 November 1864, p 4.

The oversight was quickly fixed, and a new law in 1865 once again took voting rights away from women. However, Australia was very early in granting women full voting rights, in 1902.

 

 

On this day: a suffragette march in New York

Some 20 000 women marched in New York City on the 23rd of October, 1915. In the lead up to an election, women demanded the right to vote.

It was another five years before women nation-wide in the United States received that right.

Source

Pre-election_suffrage_parade_NYCPre-election suffrage parade, New York City, October 23, 1915. 20,000 women marched.

On this day: the death of Kate Sheppard

Kate Sheppard, photographed in 1905.

In 1905

Kate Sheppard, New Zealand’s most famous suffragette, died on the 13th of July, 1934.

Born to Scottish parents in England in 1847, Sheppard moved to New Zealand in 1869.

She became a significant figure both in gaining women the vote, and then in getting women to the polls for the first time in 1893.

NZ_Dollar_TenNew Zealand ten-dollar note Kate Sheppard

New Zealand was a leading nation in women’s suffrage, and Sheppard’s efforts gained her a place on the country’s $10 note.

On this day: Emily Davison’s collision with a racehorse

On the 4th of June, 1913 militant suffragette Emily Davison rushed onto the racetrack at the Epsom Derby, running in front of a racehorse. She was trampled by the horse and died four days later.

It is unknown exactly what her motives were, but as she had clear plans for the rest of the day and for the days immediately afterwards, it seems she had not planned to become a martyr for her cause.

Emily_davison_killed_1913Emily Davison is struck by King George's horse, Anmer, and knocked unconscious. She died four days later. 4th June 1913.

The horse’s jockey got his foot caught in the stirrup and was dragged along, unconscious, but survived.

On this day: the Women’s Journal Cover

The edition of the Women’s Journal from the 8th of March, 1913 reports on the suffragette march in Washington D.C. five days earlier.

Even though it was one of the most influential of marches of its kind, more than two-hundred people had to be treated in hospital after being attacked by mostly male crowds who were against giving women the vote.

Woman's Journal of March 8, 1913.