Waiting for Battle

A British sentry is photographed here in the lead-up to the Battle of the Somme. Seen on the 28th of June, 1916 – three days before the months-long battle began – he watches from outside Café Jordan, Mailly Maillet, France.

The photographer was Ernest Brooks, a Englishman most famous for his work in the First World War.

The_Battle_of_the_Somme,_July-november_1916_Q720 A British mounted sentry outside Cafe Jordan, Mailly Maillet, 28th June 1916. The Battle of the SOmme.

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Posts I scheduled but never actually finished writing have been posting. Sorry about that!

On this day: Preparations for Battle

This image is of the British Army preparing mortar ammunition in Acheux, France for the infamous Battle of the Somme in the First World War. The image is dated the 28th of June, 1916, while the battle began on the 1st of July, resulting in over a million casualties (about one third of the soldiers who fought).

The battle concluded on the 18th of November.

The_Battle_of_the_Somme,_July-november_1916_Q749 The Battle of the Somme Trench mortar ammunition behind the lines. Acheux, 28th June 1916.

On this day: Heading to War

28th June 1916: British troops near Doullens, France head to the front to begin the Battle of the Somme.

This infamous First World War battle claimed the lives of about a third of the three million soldiers who fought from the start of July until mid-November.

The_Battle_of_the_Somme,_July-november_1916_The regimental transport of the 10th Battalion, East Yorkshire Regiment (Hull Commercials) marching to the front line; near Doullens, 28th Jun

On this day…

USS_Manatee_(AO-58)_HMAS_Warramunga_(I44)27th June 1951 A United States Navy fleet oiler (left) refuels a Royal Australian Navy destroyer (right) off the Korean Peninsula during the Kore

27th June 1951: The United States Navy fleet oiler, USS Manatee (left) refuels the Royal Australian Navy destroyer, HMAS Warramunga (right) off the Korean Peninsula during the Korean War.

On this day: a Disaster in Montserrat

Montserrat_Plymouth_Street_LampAsh piled streetlamp high on the Streets of Plymouth (1999). Photo by Gary Mark Smith. Volcanic Eruption.

The aftermath of the disaster, photographed in 1999.

Human settlement on the Caribbean island and British Overseas Territory of Montserrat was changed forever on the 25th of June, 1997. Following a couple of years of volcanic activity, on this day a series of pyroclastic flows and lahars (mudslides or debris flows) devastated the capital, Plymouth.

Residents of Plymouth and other settlements had been evacuated some time earlier, but had moved back when the disaster occurred. Nineteen people died before residents were evacuated again – this time permanently.

Today Plymouth is a ghost town. Following the disaster more than two-thirds of the island’s population left. Most did not return.