On this day: Market Day in Ireland

Would_have_been_perfect_if_the_Butcher's_Shop_was_called_Hazlett!_(9553954028)Very patiently queueing horses at the Market Square in Dromore, Co. Down. Ireland Edwardian Northern Ireland

From the National Library of Ireland

This photograph is thought to be from Sunday the 9th of October, 1904. Horses wait in a queue in the market town of Dromore in County Down.

Dromore is now in Northern Ireland.

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On this day: a Crime in North East England

James_Waters_alias_Joseph_Turnbull,_arrested_for_housebreaking_25 September 1906At North Shields Police Court today, James Turnbull, alias Waters, a young man, was charged with breaking

Source

On the 25th of September, 1906 in North East England a young man named James Waters was arrested for housebreaking.

The story that appeared in the Shields Daily News is below. It should be noted that the word “prosecutrix” – a word relating to female victims who prosecute – is no longer recognised by spell-checks.

HOUSEBREAKING AT NORTH SHIELDS. ACCUSED COMMITTED FOR TRIAL.
At North Shields Police Court today, James Turnbull, alias Waters, a young man, was charged with breaking and entering the dwelling-house, no. 2 Camp Terrace, and stealing a silver serviette ring, a lady’s silver watch, a silver spoon, a ring, bracelet, and locket, the property of Eliz. Jackson.
Richard Appleby-Jackson, an articled clerk and estate agent residing at no. 2 Camp Terrace, said that on the 29th Aug. last he and the other members of the family left home and returned on the 12th Sept, finding that it had been broken into, and that a number of articles valued at £4 8s had been stolen. On the 20th inst., from what he was told, he went to the police station and there identified a serviette ring, a watch, a spoon, and other articles as the property of his mother.
Anna Ramsey, residing in Howard Street, said that while the prosecutrix was from home she kept the keys of the house. On the 4th Sept she went there for the purpose of watering the plants and found everything in order. She locked the house up before she left, everything then being secure. She returned three days later and found the house in a state of disorder.
Mary Isabel Davies, a cook in the employ of the prosecutrix, said that while her mistress was away she went to live in Bedford Street. On the 6th Sept she obtained the keys from the last witness in order to do some cleaning. She went next day, and was unable to open the front door because the chain on the inside had been put on, and she was obliged to get assistance in order to force an entrance. When she went into the house everything was in a state of disorder and she immediately informed the police.
Michael D. Hart, dealer in second-hand goods, 120 Pilgrim Street, Newcastle, stated that on the 7th inst. the prisoner came to his shop and offered to sell the locket, bracelet and ring produced, which he said belonged to his wife, and upon which he wished to raise some money, that he was out of employment. Witness gave 5s for them. Accused also offered to sell a silver serviette ring, a spoon, and a brooch, which witness declined to buy.
A watchmaker and jeweller, belonging to West Hartlepool, said that on Sept 8th the prisoner came to his shop and offered the serviette ring, photo frame and spoon for sale, saying he was “hard up”. Witness bought the articles for 4s. Later in the day he returned with a lady’s silver watch and offered to dispose of it for 10s. It was, however, defective and he accordingly declined to buy it.
Detective Radcliffe deposed to visiting the house in Camp Terrace on the 7th inst and finding the house in a state of disorder. The door leading from the front to the back of the house was fastened and he had to climb through the serving aperture in order to get to the kitchen.
Detective Inspector Thornton said that on the 14th inst. he went to West Hartlepool Police Station, where the serviette ring, spoon, photo frame, and watch were handed to him in the presence of the accused, who said they were the things he got from a house in North Shields. Witness told him there was a ring, a locket and bracelet missing from the same house. Prisoner replied that he sold them to a second-hand dealer in Pilgrim Street, Newcastle. On being charged this morning the prisoner made no reply.
Formally charged by the Clerk (Col. R. F. Kidd), prisoner had still nothing to say. He was committed for trial at the Quarter Sessions.

 

On this day: a Royal Visit in Canada

King Edward VII came to power in January of 1901, upon the death of his mother, Queen Victoria. The King’s son and heir and his wife, the Duke of York and the Duchess of Cornwall, subsequently went on a world tour of British territories.

They are photographed here in Ottawa, Canada’s capital city, attending a lacrosse tournament on the 21st September.

Ottawa Canada Duke's visit, 21st September, 1901. Royal party at Lacrosse match. 1901 royal tour of Canada by Duke and Duchess of Cornwall and York. Edwardian era.

That day the Duke also presented medals:

On this day: a school in Ireland

The Carrickfergus Model School in County Antrim, Ireland (now Northern Ireland) is seen here on the 19th of July, 1907. The school opened in the Victorian era, and is still running today.

Source

Carrickfergus_Model_School,_County_Antrim_(9835994746) Photograph of Carrickfergus Model School, County Antrim. Northern Ireland. 19th Jul7 1907.

Cartier: The Exhibition

Cartier The Exhibition National Gallery of Australia Canberra

Just a little bit too much?!

Australia’s National Gallery, which is here in Canberra, has had some pretty amazing “blockbusters” recently (however I’m worried about the new director coming in soon).

The last big one I went to see was the Versailles exhibition, where So Much stuff from the Palace of Versailles, and so many historically significant pieces, were brought out from France for a few months.

Now, we have the Cartier exhibition – which is ending in a few days. We went to see it on Saturday.

And – wow. For starters I can’t believe that there was no security of any sort when there were billions of dollars of diamonds and other precious jewels on display.

They weren’t just any diamonds either; these were pieces from Britain’s royal collection, things the Queen wears, tiaras from royal weddings (e.g. the one Kate Middleton wore for hers), and crowns worn by Queen Victoria’s daughters. And these were pieces from Hollywood: jewels that belonged to Elizabeth Taylor, Grace Kelly etc. There was even a clock belonging to a US President.

These heiresses were seriously rich!

It was also fascinating to see how much money was coming from Gilded Age New York. So many obscenely enormous sets of jewels belonged to the American heiresses who married into the British aristocracy – just like in shows like Downton Abbey, and in all those books I read.

There were also other things, like costumes from the Ballet Russes (the NGA bought most of the world-famous company’s costumes many years ago, before anybody else thought to), and pieces belonging to Victorian/Edwardian opera star Dame Nellie Melba.

I was told that two hours wasn’t long enough to see everything, and I thought that was ridiculous: after all how many diamonds could there possibly be?

It turns out two hours was nowhere near long enough.

DIamond Tiara Cartier The Exhibition National Gallery of Australia Canberra

I’ve seen crown jewel collections in a number of countries in Europe. I’ve been whisked past a handful of crowns at the Tower of London on a travellator a few times. Nothing I’ve seen anywhere else is close to what is on display in Canberra at the moment.

This is how close we got to things – even with a weekend crowd. This is Kate Middleton’s wedding tiara:

I’m really hoping the new director realises what an amazing gallery we have here. His “vision” for the gallery’s future sounds, frankly, like garbage. I want more Versailles and Cartier and Impressionists exhibitions, please. Not “homegrown modern art”!

March 1906: Destruction in Yorkshire

The seaside resort of Hornsea in East Riding of Yorkshire, England was devastated by storms in March of 1906. The timber defences along the coastline were destroyed, and much of the beach was swept away.

Around 1907 work began on a new seawall. It can be seen completed in the second image, taken in 1910.

Hornsea_seafront_1906_after_storm_and_1910_after_construction_of_sea_wall Hornsea seafront 1906 after storm and 1910 after construction of sea wall 1912 book. the East Riding of Yorkshir

On this day: Cyclone destruction in Queensland

StateLibQld_2_182515_Destruction_of_part_of_Townsville_Grammar_School_caused_by_Cyclone_'Leonta'_in_1903Cyclone Leonta was a tropical cyclone that caused severe damage in North Queenslan

Rubble at Townsville Grammar School. X

Cyclone Leonta hit the north of the state of Queensland in Australia on the 9th of March, 1903.

StateLibQld_2_187151_Destruction_of_the_Burns,_Philp_and_Company's_Bulk_Store_in_Townsville_caused_by_Cyclone_'Leonta',_1903Cyclone Leonta was a tropical cyclone that caused severe damag

The ruined Burns, Philp and Company’s Bulk Store in Townsville. X

One of the most damaging storms recorded in the tropical region at the time, the storm lasted for around twelve hours.

StateLibQld_2_188687_Storm_damaged_Anglican_Cathedral,_Townsville,_1903Cyclone Leonta was a tropical cyclone that caused severe damage in North Queensland on 9 March 1903. It lasted for

Townsville’s Anglican Cathedral lost its roof. X

Significant destruction was recorded in Townsville, with buildings such as schools and churches suffering major damage.

StateLibQld_2_182511_Destruction_of_the_Townsville_Hospital's_Harvey_Ward_caused_by_Cyclone_'Leonta',_1903Cyclone Leonta was a tropical cyclone that caused severe damage in North Queensl

Destruction at Townsville Hospital. X

At least fourteen lives were lost in the storm, twelve in Townsville and two inland in the town of Charters Towers.

StateLibQld_2_85280_Australian_Joint_Stock_Bank_at_Bowen_after_the_1903_cycloneCyclone Leonta was a tropical cyclone that caused severe damage in North Queensland on 9 March 1903. It las

The damaged Australian Joint Stock Bank in Bowen. X

Severe damage was also recorded, with many houses lost, in towns such as Bowen and Ayr.