On this day: Women Demonstrate in Scotland

_The_Great_Procession_and_Women's_Demonstration_,_1909_on_Princes_Street,_EdinburghThe Great Procession and Women's Demonstration - Edinburgh. 9th October 1909. Scotland. Women's Suffrag

This photograph shows the so-called Great Procession and Women’s Demonstration that took place in Edinburgh, Scotland on the 9th of October, 1909.

Amongst the banners being carried are those calling for Votes for Women. Women in the United Kingdom were not given equal voting rights as men until 1928.

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On this day: the Coronation of King Edward VII and Queen Alexandra

Edward_VIIs_coronation_procession_London_9_August_1902Procession passing along a busy London thoroughfare during the Coronation of King Edward VII and Queen Alexandra (1841-1910) on 9 Au

The Procession in State through London’s streets.

The coronation of Britain’s King Edward VII and Queen Alexandra took place on the 9th of August, 1902, more than a year and a half after the death of Queen Victoria, Edward’s mother and predecessor.

The coronation, initially set for the 26th of June, was postponed because of the King’s ill health. This caused significant problems for many people. Numerous functions had been planned for the day, and foreign dignitaries were in London to celebrate. Additionally, rooms on the parade route across London had been rented for high prices, which resulted in landmark court cases when the customers missed out.

From his sickbed Edward insisted that the “Coronation Dinner for the Poor of London” go ahead as planned, and 500 000 meals were served.

The Procession in State – pictured above on revised August date – was supposed to include military units from a number of European countries, but they all had to return home before the coronation finally took place.

A second procession following the one on the day of the coronation was also postponed until the end of October, again because the King was in poor health.

Edward, overweight and a heavy smoker, died less than eight years after his coronation.

Alexandra lived another fifteen and a half years after her husband’s death.

 

 

On this day: A King’s Coronation

City_of_London_(14929011094)Sir Marcus Samuel, Lord Mayor of London makes his way to Westminster Abbey from Guildhall for the Coronation of Edward VII on Saturday 9th August 1902.

The Coronation of Edward VII took place in London on Saturday the 9th of August, 1902, more than a year and a half after the death of the King’s mother and predecessor, Queen Victoria. The event had been postponed due to the King’s ill health.

In this photograph Sir Marcus Samuel, Lord Mayor of London, travels to Westminster Abbey from Guildhall for the event.

He travels in the Lord Mayor’s State Coach, which was built in Holborn in 1757.

The new King reigned until his death in May, 1910.

On this day…

Creator H. Allison & Co. Photographers Date 22nd November 1906 McAdam family of Ashfield, Cootehill, County Cavan. Ireland Edwardian Era

Source

22nd November 1906: the McAdam family of Ashfield, Cootehill, County Cavan (which falls in modern-day Republic of Ireland).

Since the Partition of Ireland in the 1920s County Cavan, part of the region of Ulster, has formed part of the Border Region with Northern Ireland.

The photograph was taken by H. Allison & Co. Photographers, and is held in the public record office of Northern Ireland.

On this day: Market Day in Ireland

Would_have_been_perfect_if_the_Butcher's_Shop_was_called_Hazlett!_(9553954028)Very patiently queueing horses at the Market Square in Dromore, Co. Down. Ireland Edwardian Northern Ireland

From the National Library of Ireland

This photograph is thought to be from Sunday the 9th of October, 1904. Horses wait in a queue in the market town of Dromore in County Down.

Dromore is now in Northern Ireland.

On this day: a Crime in North East England

James_Waters_alias_Joseph_Turnbull,_arrested_for_housebreaking_25 September 1906At North Shields Police Court today, James Turnbull, alias Waters, a young man, was charged with breaking

Source

On the 25th of September, 1906 in North East England a young man named James Waters was arrested for housebreaking.

The story that appeared in the Shields Daily News is below. It should be noted that the word “prosecutrix” – a word relating to female victims who prosecute – is no longer recognised by spell-checks.

HOUSEBREAKING AT NORTH SHIELDS. ACCUSED COMMITTED FOR TRIAL.
At North Shields Police Court today, James Turnbull, alias Waters, a young man, was charged with breaking and entering the dwelling-house, no. 2 Camp Terrace, and stealing a silver serviette ring, a lady’s silver watch, a silver spoon, a ring, bracelet, and locket, the property of Eliz. Jackson.
Richard Appleby-Jackson, an articled clerk and estate agent residing at no. 2 Camp Terrace, said that on the 29th Aug. last he and the other members of the family left home and returned on the 12th Sept, finding that it had been broken into, and that a number of articles valued at £4 8s had been stolen. On the 20th inst., from what he was told, he went to the police station and there identified a serviette ring, a watch, a spoon, and other articles as the property of his mother.
Anna Ramsey, residing in Howard Street, said that while the prosecutrix was from home she kept the keys of the house. On the 4th Sept she went there for the purpose of watering the plants and found everything in order. She locked the house up before she left, everything then being secure. She returned three days later and found the house in a state of disorder.
Mary Isabel Davies, a cook in the employ of the prosecutrix, said that while her mistress was away she went to live in Bedford Street. On the 6th Sept she obtained the keys from the last witness in order to do some cleaning. She went next day, and was unable to open the front door because the chain on the inside had been put on, and she was obliged to get assistance in order to force an entrance. When she went into the house everything was in a state of disorder and she immediately informed the police.
Michael D. Hart, dealer in second-hand goods, 120 Pilgrim Street, Newcastle, stated that on the 7th inst. the prisoner came to his shop and offered to sell the locket, bracelet and ring produced, which he said belonged to his wife, and upon which he wished to raise some money, that he was out of employment. Witness gave 5s for them. Accused also offered to sell a silver serviette ring, a spoon, and a brooch, which witness declined to buy.
A watchmaker and jeweller, belonging to West Hartlepool, said that on Sept 8th the prisoner came to his shop and offered the serviette ring, photo frame and spoon for sale, saying he was “hard up”. Witness bought the articles for 4s. Later in the day he returned with a lady’s silver watch and offered to dispose of it for 10s. It was, however, defective and he accordingly declined to buy it.
Detective Radcliffe deposed to visiting the house in Camp Terrace on the 7th inst and finding the house in a state of disorder. The door leading from the front to the back of the house was fastened and he had to climb through the serving aperture in order to get to the kitchen.
Detective Inspector Thornton said that on the 14th inst. he went to West Hartlepool Police Station, where the serviette ring, spoon, photo frame, and watch were handed to him in the presence of the accused, who said they were the things he got from a house in North Shields. Witness told him there was a ring, a locket and bracelet missing from the same house. Prisoner replied that he sold them to a second-hand dealer in Pilgrim Street, Newcastle. On being charged this morning the prisoner made no reply.
Formally charged by the Clerk (Col. R. F. Kidd), prisoner had still nothing to say. He was committed for trial at the Quarter Sessions.