On this day: a new Parliament House

Construction of New Parliament House, Canberra, 26 April 1988. Australia. Federal Government.

In this photograph dated the 26th of April, 1988, the massive flagpole is constructed on top of Australia’s new Parliament House in the capital city, Canberra.

The new building was constructed at the time of Australia’s bicentenary, replacing what would become known as Old Parliament House, the white building at the front of the picture.

New Parliament House was officially opened by Queen Elizabeth II on the 9th of May.

 Opening_parliament_house_1988Crowds attend the official opening of the new Parliament House Building in 1988. Canberra.

The official opening in 1988.

On this day: the demolition of the Old Melbourne Gaol

Australia’s Old Melbourne Gaol photographed while being taken apart on the 19th of April, 1937.

The gaol is most famous for being the place of the execution of bushranger (highwayman) Ned Kelly in 1880.

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On this day: the bombing of Darwin

800px-Darwin_42The explosion of an oil storage tank and clouds of smoke from other oil tanks hit during the first Japanese air raid on Australia's mainland, at Darwin on 19 February 1942.

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The first of Japan’s Second World War attacks on Darwin, Australia occurred on the 19th of February, 1942.

The same fleet that bombed Pearl Harbor bombed the Northern Territory, but considerably more bombs were dropped on Australia than in the US.

Remains_of_the_Darwin_Post_OfficeRemains of the Darwin Post Office after the first Japanese Air Raid. 19 February 1942.

Darwin Post Office destroyed X

The attack came in two waves, and hundreds of people – including civilians – were killed. It was the beginning of many Japanese attacks on Australia (there were approximately 100 more attacks), who had been involved in the conflict since the beginning of the war.

On this day: the Tasmanian bushfires

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On the 7th of February, 1967, Tasmania’s deadliest fire disaster occurred in the middle of a summer heatwave.

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Destruction near the state’s capital city, Hobart. X

In what would come to be known as the Black Tuesday fires, 62 people were killed and over 900 were injured. Thousands of homes and animals were lost, and the damage was estimated to be around $40 000 000 at the time ($100 000 000 in today’s money).

tasmanian-bushfire-1967-home-burninga-couple-watch-homes-burn-in-the-1967-tasmanian-bushfires

People watch homes burn.

The causes of the disaster are listed as heatwave and strong winds, back burning (hazard reduction burns that got out of control), and arson.

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The Cascade Brewery was destroyed. X

There were 110 fires on the day, and only 22 were listed as accidents.