On this day: Queen Victoria’s Golden Jubilee

Queen Victoria celebrated her Golden Jubilee on the 20th of June, 1887. This photograph is of Regent Street in London decorated for the event.

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View down Regent Street looking north and showing the decorations for Queen Victoria's Golden Jubilee in 1887.

On this day: Women’s Suffrage in Norway.

Norwegian women, participating in a woman suffrage parade in New York, 1913. women's suffrage

Norwegian women participate in at a suffrage march in New York in 1913. X

Women in Norway earned the right to vote in stages, however a milestone was reached on the 14th of June, 1907, when middle class women were finally granted permission to vote in parliamentary elections.

While women’s suffrage came fairly early to Norway, by this point in time women in countries such as New Zealand and Australia had had full voting rights for several years.

At the parliamentary election in 1909, women of the bourgeoisie and middle class were entitled to vote for the first time.

Women vote in 1909.

The first Norwegian parliamentary election to include women was held in 1909.

It was not until 1913 that women’s voting rights equal to men’s were granted.

On this day: the first woman nominated for US President

Victoria_Woodhull_by_Mathew_Brady_c1870 Victoria Claflin Woodhull, later Victoria Woodhull Martin (September 23, 1838 – June 9, 1927) was an American leader of the woman's suffrage mov

Portrait by Mathew Brady

On the 10th of May, 1872, for the first time in the history of the United States, a woman was nominated for President.

Victoria Woodhull, a leader in the women’s suffrage movement, was born in September, 1838. The legality of her nomination is disputed for a number of reasons, including the fact she was under the required minimum age of thirty-five at the time.

She was the candidate for the Equal Rights Party. Though she was unsuccessful, she tried again a number of times over the following couple of decades.

On this day: the Irish government stands up to the Catholic Church

On the 12th of March, 1985, the government of the Republic of Ireland finally stood up to the powerful Catholic Church and legalised contraception.

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Women leave Dublin on their protest journey to Belfast.

The 1970s saw feminists travelling to Belfast in Northern Ireland and returning home with contraceptives, risking arrest for importing illegal products. They were met by protestors upon their arrival home.

Illegal in the Republic in all circumstances until 1980, a new law allowed some contraception to be dispensed by a pharmacist to people with a doctor’s prescription.

This highly restrictive law was finally changed five years later, despite conservative opposition.

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Some Americans were so outraged that “Holy Ireland” now allowed contraception, they wrote to the Prime Minister to complain.

Even so, advertising of contraceptives was still banned, and Ireland continued to have one of the highest birth rates in the developed world.

On this day: the death of Martina von Trapp

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Martina von Trapp, the inspiration for the character of Gretl in The Sound of Music, died giving birth to her first child on the 25th of February, 1951. She was thirty at the time.

Martina was not particularly similar to her movie version, as she had dark hair and eyes, and was in her late teens when she left Austria, not five, as she is in the movie.

She was buried in Vermont, holding her stillborn daughter.

On this day: the plane crash that killed an entire sporting team

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Found in the wreckage X

On the 15th of February, 1961 the plane transporting the entire US figure skating team to the World Championships crashed in Belgium, killing everyone on board.

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Two days earlier, national ladies’ champion Laurence Owen, aged sixteen, had been featured on the cover of Sports Illustrated. There is a common myth that appearing on the cover of the magazine curses athletes, as she is not the only person to have something terrible happen soon afterwards.

 owens-girlslaurence-and-maribel-owen-with-their-legendary-mother-coach-maribel

The Owen family. X

Owen’s sister Maribel, also a member of the team, and her mother, a coach and former champion herself, were also on the flight.

In addition to the seventy-two people on the plane, a farmer was also killed by flying debris.

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The team boards the plane the day before the crash. X

Once news of the crash got out, the Championships, scheduled to be held in Prague, were cancelled to honour the victims.