1992: Ukrainian Champions in Barcelona

The 1992 Summer Olympic Games in Barcelona were held from late July to early August. Following the breakup of the Soviet Union the year before, athletes from the former USSR competed under their own flags and national anthems in individual events, and for the Unified Team in group events.

Ukrainian rhythmic gymnasts Alexandra Timochenko and Oksana Skaldina came home with the gold and bronze medals. They are the two fair-haired first place-getters pictured below at the 1991 World Championships.

Alexandra Timochenko (Ukraine), Oksana Kostina and Oksana Oxana Skaldina (Ukraine) (URSS) 1991 World Rhythmic Gymnastics Champions

Under their own flag for the first time, Ukraine’s 1992 female artistic gymnasts also outshone their teammates, with the women winning a further two gold, a silver, and two bronze medals individually, as well as a share in the team gold with their Belarusian, Uzbek and Russian teammates.

Stamp_of_Ukraine_s23 Rhythmic Gymnastics Stamp of Ukraine 1992 Barcelona Olympic Games

Ukrainian stamp from 1992, featuring Olympic Rhythmic Gymnastics. X

Despite almost no funding and an ongoing war with Russia, Ukrainian gymnasts continue to win Olympic medals, most recently gold and silver in the men’s competition in 2016. Many gymnasts from the country have moved to compete for other nations in order to access proper training facilities. Following the 2016 Rio Games, the equipment used in the competition was donated to Ukraine’s gymnastics federation.

The Canary Girls

The so-called “Canary girls” were British women who worked through the First World War to make trinitrotoluene (TNT) shells. The nickname was given to them as repeated exposure to the substances they used turned their skin the colour of a canary.

Hundreds of the women became ill from the conditions they worked in, with one hundred fatalities reported.

The image below is of women in Nottinghamshire in July, 1917.

Female munitions workers guide 6 inch howitzer shells being lowered to the floor at the Chilwell ammunition factory in Nottinghamshire, UK. July 1917.

On this day: Queen Victoria’s Golden Jubilee

Queen Victoria celebrated her Golden Jubilee on the 20th of June, 1887. This photograph is of Regent Street in London decorated for the event.

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View down Regent Street looking north and showing the decorations for Queen Victoria's Golden Jubilee in 1887.

On this day: Women’s Suffrage in Norway.

Norwegian women, participating in a woman suffrage parade in New York, 1913. women's suffrage

Norwegian women participate in at a suffrage march in New York in 1913. X

Women in Norway earned the right to vote in stages, however a milestone was reached on the 14th of June, 1907, when middle class women were finally granted permission to vote in parliamentary elections.

While women’s suffrage came fairly early to Norway, by this point in time women in countries such as New Zealand and Australia had had full voting rights for several years.

At the parliamentary election in 1909, women of the bourgeoisie and middle class were entitled to vote for the first time.

Women vote in 1909.

The first Norwegian parliamentary election to include women was held in 1909.

It was not until 1913 that women’s voting rights equal to men’s were granted.

On this day: the first woman nominated for US President

Victoria_Woodhull_by_Mathew_Brady_c1870 Victoria Claflin Woodhull, later Victoria Woodhull Martin (September 23, 1838 – June 9, 1927) was an American leader of the woman's suffrage mov

Portrait by Mathew Brady

On the 10th of May, 1872, for the first time in the history of the United States, a woman was nominated for President.

Victoria Woodhull, a leader in the women’s suffrage movement, was born in September, 1838. The legality of her nomination is disputed for a number of reasons, including the fact she was under the required minimum age of thirty-five at the time.

She was the candidate for the Equal Rights Party. Though she was unsuccessful, she tried again a number of times over the following couple of decades.