Celebrating the end of the Great War

These images were taken in London in early November of 1918, as the First World War drew to a close.

On the 5th of the month captured German field guns were put on display along the Mall, stretching from Admiralty Arch to Buckingham Palace.

On the 13th of November the guns were taken to Trafalgar Square, where people attempted to set them alight in a bonfire.

From the collection of the Imperial War Museums.

The_Mall_(13962686919)These images were taken in London in early November of 1918, as the First World War drew to a close. Captured German field guns were put on display along the Mall,

These images were taken in London in early November of 1918, as the First World War drew to a close. Captured German field guns were put on display along the Mall, stretching from Admira

These images were taken in London in early November of 1918, as the First World War drew to a close. Captured German field guns were put on display along the Mall, stretching from Admira

And a display on nearby Waterloo Place, St James’s.

These images were taken in London in early November of 1918, as the First World War drew to a close. Captured German field gun on Waterloo Place St James's.

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On this day: British women prepare for invasion

The_British_Army_in_the_United_Kingdom_1939-45_Second World War Two 23rd October 1941 Women of Britains Auxiliary Territorial Service (ATS) operate a rangefinder during anti-aircraft

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23rd October 1941: Women of Britain’s Auxiliary Territorial Service (ATS) operate a rangefinder during anti-aircraft training on the beach of Weybourne in Norfolk, England.

Weybourne was considered to be at serious risk of invasion during the Second World War, and the region was prepared accordingly.

The ATS was formed in 1938, and existed until 1949, when it was incorporated into the Women’s Royal Army Corps.

On this day: a Rail Disaster in London

 

The scene looking south over the aftermath of the Harrow and Wealdstone train crash on 8 October 1952. The United Kingdom's worst peacetime rail disaster.

The United Kingdom’s worst peacetime rail disaster occurred at London’s Harrow and Wealdstone station on the 8th of October, 1952.

The scene looking south over the aftermath of the Harrow and Wealdstone train crash on 8 October 1952.Rescue workers around wrecked coaches after the Harrow and Wealdstone train crash on

112 people were killed when the City of Glasgow – an express train from Perth, Scotland – crashed into the back of a local passenger train at rush hour. The wreckage covered other rail lines, resulting in a third train – another express – to crash.

The scene looking south over the aftermath of the Harrow and Wealdstone train crash on 8 October 1952. The badly damaged locomotive of the Perth express train No. 46242 Coronation Class

The wrecked City of Glasgow.

In addition to over a hundred deaths, 340 other people were injured, with 88 transported to hospital for treatment.

The overturned second Liverpool locomotive No. 46202 and wrecked coaches after the Harrow and Wealdstone train crash on 8 October 1952.

An investigation found that the driver of the Perth train missed three signals before crashing, but as those involved were killed, the reason for this was never discovered.

On this day: Oxford Street during the Blitz

The damaged Peter Robinson department store at Oxford Circus, following a German air raid on London, September 1940. Second World War Two

Oxford Street, London’s famous shopping boulevard, suffered heavy damage from German bombing during the Second World War.

On the night of 17-18 September, 1940, some of London’s best-known establishments were hit.

This photograph shows the destroyed façade of the Peter Robinson department store at Oxford Circus. The business was founded in 1833.