On this day: Reconstruction in London

EPSON scanner image

This image, taken on the 14th of July, 1955, shows reconstruction in the City of London. The scaffolding surrounds what was left of the church of All Hallows-by-the-Tower after extensive German bombing during the Second World War.

The Tower of London can be seen in the background.

The destruction was particularly devastating as a church had stood on the site since the year 675.

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Women’s London: A Tour Guide to Great Lives by Rachel Kolsky

Women's London A Tour Guide to Great Lives by Rachel Kolsky

Women’s London is the only guidebook that focuses on the women who have shaped London through the centuries and the legacy they have left behind. This new book provides the perfect opportunity to explore sights, statues, plaques and buildings associated with famous and some not so famous women who have left their mark on London’s heritage, culture and society. Their stories include scientists and suffragettes, reformers and royals, military and medical pioneers, authors and artists, fashion and female firsts … and more. The author, a popular London tour guide and lecturer, specialises in women’s history and has provided a series of original self-guided walking tours taking you to historic areas where important women lived, worked and are commemorated. Illustrated with new full-colour photography and specially commissioned maps, Women’s London will inspire visitors and Londoners alike to discover how much London owes to women.

Women’s London: A Tour Guide to Great Lives by Rachel Kolsky

It’s always nice to have historical nonfiction that tells the stories of women. For centuries the world in general has perpetuated the myth that men were the only people who ever achieved anything, which of course is incorrect.

Women’s London gives you information about some of history’s most famous women, but it also tells you some stories about the lesser-known women in the history of the city. For example, we learn of London’s first female cab driver (women were barred from the profession until 1977!).

While interesting, the copy of the book I read had some very problematic formatting. Even big-name guidebook companies like Lonely Planet struggle to make their ebooks accessible, so that’s no surprise.

An interesting book, with some layout issues that will confuse you.

 

Review copy provided by NetGalley.

On this day: a new Prince of Wales

Prince Charles investiture with his mother, Queen Elizabeth ll. 3rd July 1969

Source

The investiture of Prince Charles – first in line to the British throne – as Prince of Wales took place at Caernarfon Castle on the 3rd of July, 1969.

Prince Charles being invested by his mother, Queen Elizabeth ll. 3rd July 1969

The ceremony.

Cofia_1282,_a_protest_against_the_investiture_(1537984)1 Prince Charles Prince of Wales Geoff Charles 6th March 1969

Despite the general popularity of the event, some Welsh people felt the investiture was a sign of the subjugation of Wales. A large protest was held several weeks before, on the 6th of March.

Prince_Charles'_Investiture_1_(1559160)Photographs by Welsh photo journalist Geoff Charles Prince Charles' Investiture at Caernarfon Castle 3rd July 1969

Photograph of the procession by Welsh photojournalist Geoff Charles.

The entire event can be seen in footage from the BBC.

100 Years Ago: Britain’s Deadliest Explosion

Women_at_work_during_the_First_World_War-_Munitions_Production,_Chilwell,_Nottinghamshire,_England,_UK,_c_1917_Q30011A Around 21 August, 1917

The factory in August of 1917.

On the 1st of July, 1918, the deadliest explosion in British history occurred near Chilwell in Nottinghamshire, England.

The disaster happened at National Filling Factory No. 6, a First World War munitions factory that had been in operation since 1915. The factory was known for its “Canary girls“: women shell makers.

Female munitions workers guide 6 inch howitzer shells being lowered to the floor at the Chilwell ammunition factory in Nottinghamshire, UK. July 1917.

“Canary Girls”

On the day of the disaster eight tons of TNT blew up, killing 134 people and injuring 250 others, however newspapers at the time reported a much lower death toll.

The site of the factory is now home to Chetwynd Barracks.

On this day: a Station in Wales

Buckley Junction Station Flintshire Wales 20th May 1961

This photograph is dated the 20th of May, 1961, and is of Buckley Junction Station.

Buckley, a village in the Flintshire region of Wales, is known for its distinct dialect. The unique way of speech is dying out as people come and go from the area.

On this day: the Victoria Memorial is Unveiled

Inauguration_du_Monument_de_la_reine_Victoria The Victoria Memorial's unveiling ceremony outside Buckingham Palace London 16th May 1911

The Victoria Memorial, which stands outside Buckingham Palace at the end of The Mall in London, was unveiled in a ceremony on the 16th of May, 1911.

The monument honours Queen Victoria, whose long reign had come to an end with her death a decade earlier.

The ceremony was presided over by both by King George V and his first cousin, Wilhelm II of Germany. Both men were grandsons of Victoria.

Following the ceremony it was revealed the memorial’s sculpture, Thomas Brock, was to be knighted.